Academic Course Calendar - International Law and Human Rights - 2016 - 2017

Courses and Teachers
2016 - 2017 - International Law and Human Rights
Course listings are continously updated with new information
Courses Teacher Credits # Weeks Dates
UPEACE Foundation Course
Mandatory
Gal Harmat
(Israel)
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
Mayumi Yamada
(Japan)
Mihir Kanade
(India)
Miriam Estrada
(Ecuador)
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
22 Aug-09 Sep 2016
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Council Room
Foundation Course on Public International Law
Mandatory
Mihir Kanade
(India)
Miriam Estrada
(Ecuador)
3 credits
3 weeks
14 Sep-05 Oct 2016
8:45 - 11:45 At Classroom #3
The United Nations System and UPMUNC (Part I)
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada
(Ecuador)
2 credits
2 weeks (NOTE: including one double session -day TBA- 8:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. - Notice that 17 October - National Day)
10-21 Oct 2016
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Foundation Course on Human Rights Law
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada
(Ecuador)
3 credits
3 weeks
31 Oct-15 Nov 2016
1:15 - 4:15 At Council Room
Foundation Course on International Law Related to Armed Conflict
Mandatory
Héctor Olasolo Alonso
(Spain)
Miriam Estrada
(Ecuador)
3 credits
3 weeks
21 Nov-02 Dec 2016
8:45am - 4:15pm At Classroom #3
Foundation Course on Global Law and Human Rights
Optional
Valentina Volpe
(Italy)
1 credits
1 weeks
28 Nov-02 Dec 2016
1:15pm - 4:15pm. At Classroom #1
Transitional Justice and International Criminal Law Part I
Mandatory
Cynthia Chamberlain
(Costarrican)
1 credits
1 weeks
5-9 Dec 2016
8:45am - 11:45am At Classroom #3
The Kurds between Past and Present Genocides in Iraq: Fresh Hopes or New Tragedies?
Optional
María Rita Corticelli

Mohammed Ihsan

3 credits
3 weeks
9-13 Jan 2017
8:45am - 11:45am. At Classroom #1
Transitional Justice and International Criminal Law
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada
(Ecuador)
2 credits
2 weeks
16-27 Jan 2017
1:15 - 4:15 At Council Room
Human Rights, Dignity and Peace: Reconceptualizing the World Citizenship through the Work of Hannah Arendt
Optional
Jana Lozanoska
(Yugoslavia)
1 credits
1 weeks
23-27 Jan 2017
8:45am - 11:45am At Classroom #1
Universal & Regional Mechanisms for Human Rights Protection
Mandatory
Frans Jacobus Viljoen
(South African)
Jorge Calderón

Julie Recinos
(USA)
María Pía Carazo Ortiz
(Costa Rica)
3 credits
3 weeks
31 Jan-17 Feb 2017
1:15 - 4:15 At Classroom #1
Freedom of Expression in the Digital Age
Optional
Mariateresa Garrido Villareal
(Venezuela)
1 credits
1 weeks
1-16 Feb 2017
1:15pm - 4:15pm. At Classroom #2
Tools for Conflict Resolution and Transformation
Mandatory
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
3 credits
3 weeks
22 Feb-14 Mar 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
International Protection of Vulnerable Groups and Persons
Mandatory
ILO Team -

Mihir Kanade
(India)
Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Costa Rica

3 credits
3 weeks
20 Mar-07 Apr 2017
1;15 - 4:15 At Classroom #3
Working in Conflict Areas – Field Training
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
1 credits
1 week
3-7 Apr 2017
8:45 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. At Council Room
The United Nations System and UPMUNC (Part II)
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
1 credits
3 days
19-21 Apr 2017
8:45 a.m. - 4:15 p.m. At Council Room
Human Rights Reporting, Monitoring, and Evaluation
Mandatory
Jan Arno Hessbruegge
(Germany)
3 credits
3 weeks
24 Apr-12 May 2017
8:45 - 11:45 At Classroom #1
Religion and Violent Extremism: The Case of Terrorism in the Name of Islam
Optional
Amr Abdalla
(Egypt)
1 credits
1 week
15-19 May 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Globalization and Human Rights
Mandatory
Mihir Kanade
(India)
3 credits
3 weeks
17 May-06 Jun 2017
1:15 - 4:15 At Classroom #2
Graduation Project: ISP-Thesis (8 credits) or Internship (8 credits) or Capstone (5 credits).
Mandatory
UPEACE Resident Faculty

8 credits
8 weeks
12 Jun-31 Dec 2017



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COURSE DESCRIPTION

The UPEACE Foundation Course provides a critical and concise introduction to the broad field of “Peace Studies” for students in all UPEACE programs. It initially addresses key conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of the origins and development of peace studies as an interdisciplinary area within the fields of international relations and political economy, as well as a basic understanding of conflict analysis. Based on a critical analysis of policies, strategies, policies, institutions, organizations and movements, the course then examines a range of core issues, dimensions, perspectives and paradigms for understanding the root causes of conflicts and violence and constructive strategies to address them and build peace in contemporary global, international, regional, national and local contexts, including: conflict management, conflict resolution and conflict transformation; alternative discourse analysis; militarization and disarmament; human rights violations and promotion; gender inequalities, gender-based violence and gender mainstreaming; structural violence, human security, development and globalization; environmental sustainability; corporate social responsibility; cultural and religious identities; media’s role in conflict and peacebuilding; strategies of nonviolence; and peace education. This Foundations course will be essential in catalyzing the awareness, understanding and motivation of UPEACE students from diverse academic programmes to relate, ground or intersect their specific areas of academic and practitioner interest with core theoretical, conceptual and analytical ideas in peace studies.

Contemporary international life has become unthinkable without the existence of public international law. Increasingly, international relations have become juridified, while more and more actors (international organizations, individuals, groups, NGOs, and corporations) participate in norm creation, implementation and enforcement. And, as humanity faces unprecedented challenges, the call for more cooperation and regulation is undiminished. This course offers a general overview of the topic of public international law. It provides students with a broad introduction that will focus on laying a firm foundation of knowledge about the most important doctrines and topics in this field. It will provide students with a solid grasp of the vocabulary of international law (sources, jurisdiction, responsibility, enforcement, etc.), as well as a sense of the context in which international law originates and operates and an understanding of the legal and political institutions that play a role in international law. Finally, the course will give a bird’s-eye view of a broad range of issues that are dealt with using international legal tools, such as peace and security, the use of force, human rights, international criminal law, international environmental law, and international economic law.

Ever since its establishment in 1945, the United Nations has played a pivotal role in a great variety of affairs, large or small, international and national. As such the UN has played an incisive role in the lives of people around the world. Much of what the UN does is taken for granted and even goes unnoticed by the larger public, even as an oft quoted saying argues that ‘if the UN did not exist it would have to be invented’. At the same time, millions around the world look to the UN expecting it to address many of the enormous challenges faced by humankind. This complex dynamics is complemented by the fact that the UN is both reliant on what the member states want, while at the same time being much more than the sum of its members. This course provides a comprehensive and rigorous introduction into the UN system, including its origins and history, its organizational framework  and the  functioning of various organs, agencies, bodies and programmes.  Students will critically examine the most important areas of the UN mission including the key Charter pillars of international peace and security, economic and social progress and development and human rights as well as a growing list of priorities and initiatives (e.g., gender equality and  mainstreaming; eliminating gender-based violence; environmental protection; addressing climate change; post-2015 development agenda; Global Education First Initiative; action to counter terrorism; R2P, etc). In addition, the course offers a close look at some of the challenges the UN faces, and discusses various proposals for its reform. Students will also be encouraged to reflect on how UN priorities and initiatives can be constructively addressed in their respective fields and programmes of peace studies.

Human Rights form one of the most important branches of international law and policy in the contemporary world. The experience of the 'scourge of war' during and in the immediate aftermath of World War II brought a new international recognition and focus to the rights of human beings. Today, there are several international treaties guaranteeing a wide range of rights to human beings, both in times of peace and in conflicts. These instruments also impose obligations upon States to respect, protect and fulfill those rights. Under the aegis of the United Nations and regional organizations, several bodies have been established to monitor violations of the rights of human beings. Despite these efforts, we continue to live in a world where these rights are structurally abused. Today, like never before, there is an amplified need for students and professionals from all spheres of life to not only understand and mainstream human rights into their activities, but also to be prepared to meet the growing challenges posed by current and emerging global issues. This course therefore introduces participants to the international legal human rights regime, including bottom-up approaches for the promotion of human rights and accountability for violations thereof. The course will cover a broad spectrum of foundational issues in the field of human rights, beginning with the diverse legal and non-legal approaches to the field and ending with contemporary challenges thereto.

 

 

This course introduces students to the public international law dimensions of conflicts and peace. It explores the international legal standards, both in treaty law and in customary international law, that underpin the prevention, management and resolution of inter-state and intra-state conflicts. Students will specifically be introduced to jus ad bellum (Law of War and use of force), jus in bello (International Humanitarian Law), and the responsibility to protect (R2P) doctrine. The course adopts a diverse range of approaches in order to examine the rules, procedures, successes and failures of key international organizations, including the United Nations, as well as regional organizations, in responding to peace and conflict situations. The course will explore several case studies of actual policy responses, or lack thereof. Participants will also learn about the limits that international law places on states and non-state actors in peace and conflict situations, before moving into a critical discussion on the debates surrounding enforcement of those standards in international law. Finally, the course will explore how international law intersects with other areas of inquiry related to peace and conflict studies, in order to promote multi-pronged responses to peace and conflict situations.

Global governance deals with the complexity of current international relations and new developments of public international law and administrative law. In a progressively more fragmented international framework, global governance seeks to improve the capacity of the international community to face common challenges and global problems, given the absence of a world government. The paradox of ‘governance’ without ‘government’ lies at its core, looking “for order in disorder, for coherence in contradiction, and for continuity in change” (J. N. Rosenau).
Through the lenses of four important non-state actors, the course will introduce some of the fundamental concepts of the “law of global governance”, focusing in particular on the role that non-state actors can play in promoting higher human rights and democracy standards at the national level. The overcoming of the nation-state paradigm has been indeed one of the most important developments in the contemporary legal ‘brave new world’. In the last decade of the XX century, numerous non-state actors emerged as meaningful players in global governance issues, flanking states on the international scene. International/supranational organizations, international courts, legal experts, non-governmental organizations represent as many voices in the global governance discourse, which may in turn complement, threaten or reinforces state’s action in the global arena. After having introduced what global governance is (or should be), the course will analyze, through concrete case-studies, the role of the European Union, the Venice Commission, the UN Democracy Fund and the European Court of Human Rights in addressing new global governance challenges related with human rights protection and democracy promotion. In the conclusion it will examine the potential limits and possibility of rethinking global governance.

Gross violations of human rights, including war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide are have characterized a number of contemporary conflicts and authoritarian regimes. In such contexts, questions of impunity and accountability become central to peacebuilding and reconstruction of post-conflict societies. Yet, criminal prosecution of persecutors poses challenges for post-conflict reconciliation, particularly when such reconciliation is contingent upon demands for amnesty. This course takes a holistic view on the debates surrounding linkages between serious crimes and justice.

The first part of the course provides a general introduction to the field of international criminal law. It focuses on the evolution of international crimes under international law and the role of international criminal courts in the prosecution of international crimes. Students will analyze the jurisdictional reach of international criminal courts, their relationship with national jurisdictions (primacy v. complementarity) and the impact of the interests of justice and peace in the exercise of their jurisdiction. Students will also explore the objective and subjective elements of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. Particular attention will be placed on those elements of international crimes that make them distinguishable from ordinary crimes, and on the manner in which criminal responsibility is determined by international criminal courts.

The second part of the course focuses on transitional justice, which includes the study of justice in times of transition following periods of widespread human rights abuse. These transitional periods raise a wide range of legal, ethical, and political questions that are central to the peace versus justice debate. Students will explore the strengths and limits of criminal prosecutions and the alternative mechanisms available to address the commission of international crimes. Using numerous case studies from around the world, the course will provide students with analytical tools to grapple with and to discuss the most salient issues decision-makers face in the context of transitional democracies and other situations of dealing with the past.

This course introduces students to the struggles of Kurds in the context of genocides committed against them in the past as well as in the current ongoing conflict against ISIS. It explores the Kurdish national movement and its prospects and challenges. At the end of the course, the students will have an understanding of the history of the Kurds in the Middle East with specific emphasis on the Kurds of Iraq from the birth of Kurdish nationalism to the present day. The first session will offer an overview of the history of the Kurds and their relation with the succeeding Iraqi governments. The second session will cover the history of genocides in Iraq against the Kurds and other minorities exploring the causes and the consequences for the political and social stability of the area. The third session will focus on the heritage that this culture of violence has created in the area and the genocides committed by ISIS. The fourth session will discuss the future of Iraq and the Kurds in the context of the Middle East. The last session will explore which is the future of Iraq as a country after the liberation of Mosul and the new balance of power born from the end of the war with ISIS and the definitive collapse of the order established in 1916 with the Sykes-Picot Agreement.

Gross violations of human rights, including war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide are have characterized a number of contemporary conflicts and authoritarian regimes. In such contexts, questions of impunity and accountability become central to peacebuilding and reconstruction of post-conflict societies. Yet, criminal prosecution of persecutors poses challenges for post-conflict reconciliation, particularly when such reconciliation is contingent upon demands for amnesty. This course takes a holistic view on the debates surrounding linkages between serious crimes and justice.

The first part of the course provides a general introduction to the field of international criminal law. It focuses on the evolution of international crimes under international law and the role of international criminal courts in the prosecution of international crimes. Students will analyze the jurisdictional reach of international criminal courts, their relationship with national jurisdictions (primacy v. complementarity) and the impact of the interests of justice and peace in the exercise of their jurisdiction. Students will also explore the objective and subjective elements of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. Particular attention will be placed on those elements of international crimes that make them distinguishable from ordinary crimes, and on the manner in which criminal responsibility is determined by international criminal courts.

The second part of the course focuses on transitional justice, which includes the study of justice in times of transition following periods of widespread human rights abuse. These transitional periods raise a wide range of legal, ethical, and political questions that are central to the peace versus justice debate. Students will explore the strengths and limits of criminal prosecutions and the alternative mechanisms available to address the commission of international crimes. Using numerous case studies from around the world, the course will provide students with analytical tools to grapple with and to discuss the most salient issues decision-makers face in the context of transitional democracies and other situations of dealing with the past.

The course follows an interdisciplinary approach involving several fields of studies such as: human rights (political and philosophical origins); gender, cultural and peace studies. It offers a re-examination of concepts such as human rights, dignity, justice, equality and peace along with the idea of “world citizenship” - worldliness or the cosmopolitan idea of humanity, as an answer to the ongoing challenges, discourses and trends. The main aim of the course will be to provide a re-thinking of human rights in the 21st century, as a way of addressing not only the growing “rightlessness” and “statelessness” and massive violations of human rights, but also to offer an understanding of the importance of the concepts of “dignity” and “world citizenship”, as central to human rights and peace. The course structure will be both theoretical and practical, and will involve lectures, interactions, discussions and movie and documentary screenings. It will be based on an innovative and creative approach to teaching and learning that fosters lively critical discussions, and opens up possibilities of applying the learned material outside of the classroom, providing students with skills and tools for further analysis of complex issues that basically are relevant to 21st century.

The contemporary human rights project that began in the aftermath of World War II with the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights has seen the emergence and proliferation of several specialized mechanisms at the global and regional levels for the protection of human rights. This course seeks to provide students with a solid theoretical and practical understanding of such universal and regional human rights mechanisms. Within the universal system, this course will explore the procedures and practices of the principal organs of the United Nations, the UN Charter bodies and Treaty bodies, the role of the Human Rights Council and its special procedures, as well as the role of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. It will also introduce students to the regional systems for protection of human rights in Europe, Africa and the Americas. It will analyze the successes, failures and challenges of these procedures using a comparative approach, by means of several case studies. It will also explore the important role of civil society organizations within each of the universal and regional mechanisms. In addition, the course will train students as human rights advocates to draft complaints before each of these bodies, in light of their respective rules, procedures, strengths, and limitations.  

Every communication technology presents different benefits and challenges for the protection of the right to freedom of expression, and the Internet is not the exception to this rule. Internet-based platforms provide innumerable possibilities to seek, receive, and impart information without limitations and regardless the frontiers. Thus, a reexamination of the right to freedom of expression is required. This course will introduce students to the major themes regarding the exercise and the protection of this right in the digital era.
The first part of the course will be focused on the understanding of the current social organization, and its dependency on Internet-based platforms. This contextual framework will set the basis for the legal examination of the right to freedom of expression. For this, the course will not only deal with the identification of states obligations but also with the protection of competing rights (i.e. privacy). Finally, students will be introduced to current trends regarding the exercise of the right such as protection of journalists, dissemination of hate speech, war on terror, and the role of Internet Services Providers.

Designed as an advanced workshop, this course provides a conceptual, theoretical and analytical understanding of, as well as practical skills in conflict analysis, negotiation, resolution and transformation essential in peacebuilding within and between states. Drawing on examples of complex conflicts involving nation-states, non-state groups, communities and citizens, students will examine various frameworks and tools for analyzing those conflicts, including the drivers, processes of escalation and conditions for de-escalation. The course will also provide basic knowledge, tools and skills in the vital strategy of negotiation in managing and resolving conflicts. It focuses on how the process of conducting diplomatic negotiations and other informal processes aimed at managing inter-state and intra-state conflicts have an impact on the outcomes of those conflicts, laying the foundations for outcomes ranging from stable peace to further escalation of violence. The workshop will also introduce students to various types and strategies of mediation as an important means of alternative conflict or dispute resolution. In the concluding sessions, students will examine the differences between conflict resolution and conflict transformation which focuses especially on addressing the root causes of conflicts, transforming and building long-term relationships with grassroots and community empowerment and fostering reconciliation.

This course introduces students to the international law relating to the protection of the human rights of a diverse range of vulnerable persons and groups. Many of these laws today are reflected in specialized treaties and soft laws that are aimed at protection of various vulnerable persons and groups. In particular, students will explore the law related to protection of refugees, internally displaced persons, stateless persons, citizens, forced migrants, migrant workers, trafficked persons, indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities, children, and LGBTQ persons, amongst others. The course will analyze the impact of patriarchy on the rights of women. It will specifically explore the importance of the need for a paradigm shift in considering members of such groups as subjects of human rights, rather than objects. It will examine the relationship between citizenship and protection, and the exclusion of non-citizens from protection regimes. It will analyze case studies from around the world and the successes and failures of different global, regional, national and local responses. In addition, the course will help students to develop human rights advocacy and promotion strategies in order to ensure respect for the rights of vulnerable persons and groups, including within institutional settings.

This course is intended as a practical field exercise in conflict situations, as well as an academic seminar. The students will receive a basic training on how situations of stress or crisis influence them in a mental, physical, and professional ways. A series of scenarios drawn from contemporary conflict situations are presented to the participants as they simulate the work of journalists, NGO personnel and members of international organisations.

The UPEACE Model United Nations Conference (UPMUNC) is a graduate-level simulation of the real United Nations Organization, its most important specialized agencies, and other associated organizations. UPMUNC provides a common platform for UPEACE students and participants from several other universities to discuss international affairs and to gain a greater understanding of the procedures of the United Nations. Participants become familiar with key global issues by becoming part of the international decision making process to resolve them, and in so doing, are given an opportunity to apply their skills in negotiations, public speaking, and diplomacy.

This course introduces students to the practical tools and techniques required by field-based human rights practitioners, whether working with the United Nations, other inter-governmental organizations, governments, or NGOs. Students will gain the necessary skills required in human rights reporting, monitoring and evaluation by using Human Rights Based Approaches (HRBA) – a conceptual framework which focuses on integrating the norms, standards and principles of the international human rights system into the plans, policies and processes of human rights field work. Techniques for information gathering or ‘fact-finding’, and mainstreaming HRBA in analyzing and reporting will be introduced to the students. Students will also learn about the strategic uses of reporting in a range of formal and informal settings, including in human rights advocacy, naming and shaming, policy making, and monitoring situations. Special attention is given to human rights based programming, as well as the tools for monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of interventions or projects aimed at protecting or promoting human rights. The course is hands-on and will be based on a number of practical exercises.

The course aims to develop knowledge of the religious, social, cultural and political roots of terrorism in the Muslim context, providing balanced frameworks that may lead to peaceful transformation.

The course does not start with a simplistic assumption that “religion has been the cause of all conflicts”.  Instead, the course studies critically the role of religion (along with other factors, such as nationalism, ethnicity, race, class, gender, among others) in contributing to conflict causes, influencing its persisting negative and destructive dynamics,  and in peacefully resolving and transforming conflicts.  

The course will be studied from the vantage point of the field of peace and conflict studies, using frameworks and models intended to deeply analyze several case studies from different parts of the world.  The course materials and activities will culminate in an exploration of methods and processes that would advance the positive peaceful role of religion and religious institutions in various types and levels of conflicts, and which are suitable for the realities of the 21st century.

The course will target a wide range of participants, including graduate students of The University for Peace and professionals interested in the topic of religion, conflict and peace.

The 20th and 21st centuries have been described as the age of globalization, a phenomenon which is increasingly affecting human beings in every aspect of our lives. While globalization has undoubtedly resulted in significant economic and social integration at the global level, it has also brought with it unintended consequences for the respect and promotion of human rights. The principal institutions facilitating this phenomenon, such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization (WTO), have often been accused of keeping human rights issues out of their respective domains. Corporations also have been accused of undermining human rights, and at times even of being complicit in their violation. An important feature of globalization is its nexus with development policies, including the MDGs/SDGs and development aid, often with regressive effects. The critical challenge facing the present world order, therefore, lies in ensuring that the vehicles of globalization are oriented towards the development and promotion of human rights, through appropriate laws and policies. This course will introduce students to the major themes and debates concerning the linkages between globalization and human rights and explore the new streams of critique that have enabled a confluence as well as a questioning of the globalization-human rights interface.

The Graduation Project is a concluding academic requirement intended to be a comprehensive and capstone outcome of the student educational performance. It is a higher academic exercise that enables the student to demonstrate the ability to identify a problem, determine an academic objective to address it and utilize an appropriate methodology to attain such objective. The Graduation Project is also intended to demonstrate the student’s ability to write and critically develop a professional and scholarly report. 

The Graduation Project can be fulfilled through one of the following modalities:

•Thesis:  8 credits
•Internship: 8 credits (3 months)
•Capstone: 5 credits*

Graduation Project Guidelines with detail information of each modality will be provided by your Academic Department.

*NOTE: Students who choose Capstone as Graduation Project must take an extra 3-credit course according the following options:
1.One additional course (face to face modality), which means taking 2 parallel regular master courses (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) if approved by the student's MA Programme Coordinator
2.One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality), which means taking 2 or 3 parallel courses (one face-to-face master course and one 3 credit course or two 2-credit courses approved by the student's Programme Coordinator) before June 2016
3.One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality) extended from June 2016 until December 2016 (the online course or courses must be approved by the student's Programme Coordinator)



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FACULTY

Dr. Abdalla is the Senior Advisor on Policy Analysis and Research at the Institute for Peace and Security Studies (IPSS) of Addis Ababa University, and the Senior Advisor on Conflict Resolution at KARAMAH (Muslim Women Lawyers for Human Rights). In 2013-2014, he was Vice President of SALAM Institute for Peace and Justice in Washington, D.C. From 2004-2013 he was Professor, Dean and Vice Rector at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace (UPEACE) in Costa Rica. Prior to that, he was a Senior Fellow with the Peace Operations Policy Program, School of Public Policy, at George Mason University, Virginia. He was also a Professor of Conflict Analysis and Resolution at the Graduate School of Islamic and Social Sciences in Leesburg, Virginia. He practiced law as a prosecuting attorney from 1978 to 1987 in Egypt. He then emigrated to the U.S. where he obtained a Master's degree in Sociology and a Ph.D. in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from George Mason University. He has been teaching graduate classes in conflict analysis and resolution, and has conducted training, research and evaluation of conflict resolution and peacebuilding programs in several countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. He teaches regularly (face-to-face and online) at American University in Washington, D.C., University for Peace, University of Addis Ababa, and Open University of Catalonia. Dr. Abdalla pioneered the development of the first conflict resolution training manual for the Muslim communities in the United States titled (“…Say Peace”). He also founded Project LIGHT (Learning Islamic Guidance for Human Tolerance), a community peer-based anti-discrimination project funded by the National Conference for Community and Justice (NCCJ). In 2011, he established with Egyptian UPEACE graduates a program for community prevention of sectarian violence in Egypt (Ahl el Hetta).

Cynthia Chamberlain is Legal Officer of the Trial Division at the International Criminal Court (ICC).  She has a Masters in International Law from the Universidad Autónoma and Universidad Complutense of Madrid, Spain and is currently writing her Ph.D. thesis in Leiden University, The Netherlands. Previously to her work in the ICC, she worked alongside Alda Facio, in the Women’s Justice and Gender Programme and as Professor in the University of Costa Rica.

Frans Viljoen obtained the degrees LLB, MA (in Afrikaans literature) and LLD (on the African regional human rights system) from the University of Pretoria (UP); and the degree LLM from Cambridge University.  In October 2007, he was appointed as Director of the Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria. He is also the academic co-ordinator of the LLM (Human Rights and Democratisation in Africa), presented by the Centre, in collaboration with seven partner law faculties across Africa. He is also the author of numerous articles, especially dealing with human rights issues, and International human rights law in Africa. He is editor-in-chief of the African Human Rights Law Journal and co-editor of the English and French versions of the African Human Rights Law Reports

Head, Dept. of Peace and Conflict Studies, Assistant Professor, and Academic Coordinator Gender and Peace Building Programme and Peace Education Programme

Dr. Gal Harmat holds a PhD in Gender Analysis of Peace Education and Dialogue encounters from Nitra University (Slovakia) and a M.A. in Gender and Peacebuilding from the UN-Mandated University for Peace in Costa Rica. She was a professor in conflict transformation, peace education and gender and Co-Director of the Social Justice and Peace Education Teachers Training Program, Kibbutzim Teachers College in Tel Aviv, Israel. She has also been teaching in the World Peace Academy (University of Basel), the European Peace University (Austria), and the Arts and Social Change College in Israel. As a Gender and Peacebuilding Specialist, she has extensive experience in training, conflict analysis, dialogue facilitation, capacity building, peace education, research, gender empowerment and gender mainstreaming since 1998 in various countries in Eastern Europe, Africa, and West and South East Asia. Her consultancies include intergovernmental organizations (e.g. OSCE, UN Women, UNDP, and the Council of Europe), various international and regional NGOs (e.g. Non Violent Peace Force, Friends of the Earth Middle East; Peres Centre for Peace) and corporate donors (e.g. United Bank of Switzerland; Optimus Foundation).

Héctor Olásolo Alonso Profesor Titular de Carrera, Universidad del Rosario (Colombia) Presidente, Instituto Ibero-Americano de la Haya (IIH, Holanda) Licenciado y Doctor en Derecho, con premio extraordinario de doctorado, por la Universidad de Salamanca. Magister por la Universidad de Columbia en Nueva York, donde fue nombrado Kent Scholar. Actualmente se desempeña como Profesor Titular de Carrera de Derecho Internacional de la Universidad del Rosario, Presidente del Instituto Iberoamericano de la Haya y Miembro del Miembro del roster de juristas de reconocido prestigio de la Organización de las Naciones Unidas para el nombramiento magistrados internacionales en el Tribunal Internacional para Camboya. Ha sido magistrado auxiliar de la Corte Penal Internacional, miembro de la Fiscalía del Tribunal Penal Internacional para la ex Yugoslavia, Experto asesor del Tribunal Especial para el Líbano creado por el Consejo de Seguridad de Naciones Unidas en 2007, y Perito ante la Corte Inter-Americana de Derechos Humanos. Ha dictado cursos de doctorado, postgrado y conferencias, además de en Colombia y España, en Alemania, Argentina, Bèlgica, Brasil, Canadá, Chile, Costa Rica, Estados Unidos, Francia, Holanda, Italia, México, Nicaragua, Perú, Reino Unido, Serbia, Sudáfrica, Suiza, Uruguay y Venezuela. Ha publicado 15 monografías y más de 50 artículos y capítulos de libros en español, inglés y holandés, y es actualmente el director del Anuario Ibero-Americano de Derecho Internacional Penal publicado por la Editorial de la Universidad del Rosario, la Editorial Tirant lo Blanch de España y el Instituto Ibero-Americano de la Haya en Holanda.
Jan Hessbruegge is taking a sabbatical leave from the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). Since 2005, he has worked as a United Nations human rights officer for the United Nations, where he worked for the Office of the High Commissioner on Human Rights, United Nations peacekeeping missions in Sudan and Haiti, the Commissions of Inquiry on Human Rights in Syria and North Korea, the Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women and the Representative of the Secretary-General on Internally Displaced Persons. He holds a law degree from the University of Muenster in Germany, a Master of Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School and the Diploma in Public International Law of the Hague Academy of International Law. Jan is currently pursuing a doctorate in international law at the European University Viadrina in Frankfurt (Oder), Germany.
Jan Breitling is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environment and Development at University for Peace. He holds a BSc. in Tropical Forestry, from the Technological Institute of Costa Rica, and a MSc. in Environmental Sciences from WUR Wageningen University and Research Center, The Netherlands. His research interests include root causes of deforestation and Global Environmental Change, and Environmental Governance, specifically market based approaches addressing biodiversity conservation and Climate Change.
Jana Lozanoska, LL.M in international humanitarian law from the University of Geneva, is a Doctoral Candidate at the University for Peace. Her research is a critique on human rights that is based on the idea of human dignity as proposed by the German-Jewish political theorist Hannah Arendt. Her current research interests are in the field of human rights, political theory and political philosophy. Her professional career of twelve years is a combination of academia, research and policy area. She served as an Adviser to the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Macedonia for two years. She had contributed frequently as regular columnist in several daily newspapers in Macedonia. Lozanoska had published three poetry books and one novel. She continues to research and publish on issues related to international law, human rights, gender and LGBT, regional and international organizations. Follow her doctoral research blog at: https://rethinkinghumanity.wordpress.com/
Senior Staff Attorney, Inter-American Court of Human Rights, San José, Costa Rica In charge of one of the Court’s legal teams since January 2013. Draft judgments and resolutions for deliberation by the Tribunal on contentious cases, monitoring of compliance, and provisional measures; research and write on international human rights issues; process case files and coordinate public and private hearings; prepare lectures and conferences for State officials and university students; coordinate the work of another attorney, visiting professionals, interns, legal assistants and secretaries. Liaison Officer, European Commission for Democracy through Law (Venice Commission) Contributor, The Global Community Yearbook of International Law & Jurisprudence.

Assistant Professor, Dept. of Peace and Conflict Studies and Academic Coordinator International Peace Studies Programme and International Peace Studies with specialization in Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Programme
Dr. Manish Thapa is Resident Professor of International Peace Studies at UPEACE. He is one of the founding members of Department of Conflict, Peace & Development Studies at Tribhuvan University Nepal (2007-2015). He is also currently Visiting Professor at the Institute of International Relations, University of Warsaw, Poland and Senior Research Fellow at Center for Europe – University of Warsaw- Poland. He received his Post Doctorate in International Relations from the University of Warsaw, his Doctoral Degree in International Studies from University of Tokyo, Japan and Masters Degree in Peace & Conflict Studies from European Peace University, Austria. He has served as Research Fellow in several universities and institutes in Europe and North America such as the University of Warsaw; Department of Peace & Conflict Research, Uppsala University; Brown University; McGill-Echenberg Human Rights Fellow & Jeanne Sauvé Scholar, McGill University; Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame. His publications include 6 books and numerous journal articles and book chapters including "Foreign Policy in the Global South: Anti-Westernism, Rhetoric and Identity” -(Co-editor), London: Routledge 2016 (Forthcoming - In Press); “International Relations in Asia: Great Powers and Institutions-(Co-Editor), London: Routledge 2017 (Forthcoming - In Press).

María Pía Carazo Ortiz (Costa Rica) has a Law degree from the University of Costa Rica (1996) and an LL.M. degree from the University of Heidelberg, Germany (1999). She is currently completing her Ph.D., also at the University of Heidelberg. Her areas of research include fundamental issues of Public International Law, Refugee Law, International Criminal Law, Transitional Justice, Human Rights (with an emphasis on regional protection systems) and Comparative Legal Studies (specially of Latin America, Spain, Portugal and Germany). Among her previous work experience she worked as a junior research fellow at Max-Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg, Germany. She has also lectured and taught at different institutions, including the University of Bonn, Germany.

Mariateresa Garrido is Teaching Assistant and a Doctoral Student at UPEACE. She holds two Master's Degrees one from UPEACE in International Law and the Settlement of the Disputes and one from the Central University of Venezuela in International Law. Prior to her Master's Degree she had been working in promoting and defending human rights in Venezuela with different organizations such as Transparency International and Espacio Publico. Her principal research area is related to freedom of expression and safety of journalists.

Dr. Mayumi Yamada (Japan) Assistant Professor and Doctoral Programme Coordinator.
Prior to joining UPEACE, Dr. Mayumi Yamada worked as the Recovery, Reintegration & Peace Building (RRP) Officer, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) (April, 2013 - June 30, 2014). During the December Crisis 2013 in South Sudan, she remained as a critical (life-saving) staff, directly managed one of the biggest Protection of Civilians sites (UNMISS Tomping PoC) and supported humanitarian assistance during armed-conflicts in the capital Juba. At least 27,000 people’s lives were saved in the UNMISS Tomping compound. Before the crisis, she drafted the United Nations Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF) South Sudan (2014-2016). Before joining UNMISS, she worked with UNDP Offices in Kazakhstan, Maldives, Lao PDR and Solomon Islands. She holds a Ph.D. in Sustainable Development (Poverty Reduction & Environment Conservation: Watershed Management Programme with CARE International Nepal) from Imperial College London, UK. She worked with Disaster Management Planning Unit of United Nations Centre for Regional Development, UNCRD), being one of the survivors from the Great Hanshin-Awaji earthquake in 1995. She is also the Visiting Research Fellow, Global Collaboration Centre (GLOCOL) of Osaka University.

Dr. Kanade is the Head of the Department of International Law and Human Rights at UPEACE, and is the Director of the UPEACE Human Rights Centre. He holds a Ph.D. in Peace and Conflict Studies with a specialization in Human Rights (Multilateral Trading System and Human Rights: A Governance Space Theory on Linkages) and a Masters degree in International Law and the Settlement of Disputes from UPEACE. He also holds a LL.B. from Nagpur University, India. Prior to joining UPEACE in 2009, Mihir practiced for 6 years as a lawyer in the Supreme Court of India and the Bombay High Court, focusing on issues of fundamental human rights violations. His principal area of academic research is Globalization and Human Rights.
Dr. Miriam Estrada-Castillo (Ecuador) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of International Law and Human Rights. Prior to joining UPEACE, Dr. Estrada-Castillo worked as the senior legal and political officer in the United Nations Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED). Prior to that position, she has worked with the UN system in various capacities, including as the International Prosecutor General, UN Peacekeeping Mission for East-Timor (DPKO), Expert and Vice-Chairperson of the Monitoring Committee of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), Chief of Field of the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, and the Latin America Regional Adviser on Gender, Human Rights and Culture of Peace for UNESCO. She has also worked as the President of the Ecuadorian Supreme Court of Juvenile Justice and as the Minister of Social Affairs in Ecuador. In her academic life, she worked recently as the Director of Master Degree Courses on Gender and the Law and Children in Armed Conflict, Lund University, Sweden. She is a Visiting Professor of the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law (RWI) and has also taught courses as a Visiting Professor at the Australian National University. She is the author of the Ecuadorian Law on Violence against Women and of the first Legislation for Minors and Family in the country.

Instructor, Liason, Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Specialization and Editor, Peace and Conflict Monitor and Peace and Conflict Review Ross Ryan holds degrees in political science and literature from McMaster University, Canada and the M.A. degree in environmental security from the University for Peace, Costa Rica. He is chief editor of the Peace and Conflict Monitor and managing editor of the Peace and Conflict Review, as well as instructor in the department of peace studies and liaison officer of the media, peace and conflict studies specialization. He is currently working on a research project entitled “Information Technology, Civic Engagement, and the Cyber-Ethnography of Peace Movements”.

Valentina Volpe is a Senior Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public and International Law (MPIL) in Heidelberg (Germany) and is an Associate Lecturer at the Lille Catholic University (campus of Paris) and LUISS Guido Carli University of Rome. She holds a PhD in Law and Legal Theory from the Italian Institute of Human Sciences (SUM) of Naples (today Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa) and is a former Visiting Researcher at the Yale Law School. Before joining the MPIL she worked as a project manager for a grassroots NGO in the areas of international cooperation and human rights protection. She has been lecturing in Italy, Germany, France and China.

 

Her areas of interest include global and international public law, comparative constitutional law, democracy promotion, human rights and international organisations.

 

 

 

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