Academic Course Calendar - International Law and Human Rights - 2017 - 2018

Courses and Teachers
2017 - 2018 - International Law and Human Rights
Course listings are continously updated with new information
Courses Teacher Credits # Weeks Dates
UPEACE Foundation Course
Mandatory
Alonso Muñoz
(Costa Rica)
Heather Kertyzia
(Canada)
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
Mayumi Yamada
(Japan)
Mihir Kanade
(India)
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
21 Aug-08 Sep 2017
8:45am - 11:45am At Council Room
Public International Law (3 credits)
Mandatory
José Riera-Cézanne
(United States)
Mihir Kanade
(India)
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
3 credits
3 weeks
18 Sep-06 Oct 2017
8:45am - 11:45am At Classroom #1
The United Nations System and UPMUNC (Part I)
Mandatory
José Riera-Cézanne
(United States)
Mihir Kanade
(India)
2 credits
2 weeks
11-25 Oct 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
International Human Rights Law (2 credits)
Mandatory
Mihir Kanade
(India)
2 credits
2 weeks
30 Oct-17 Nov 2017
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Technology Learning Center
Universal System for Protection of Human Rights (1 credit)
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
1 credits
1 weeks
13-17 Nov 2017
8:45am - 11:45am At Technology Learning Center
Freedom of Expression in the Digital Age
Optional
Mariateresa Garrido Villareal
(Venezuela)
1 credits
1 weeks
20-24 Nov 2017
8:45am - 11:45am At Council Room
International Law Related to Armed Conflict
Mandatory
Héctor Olasolo Alonso
(Spain)
3 credits
3 weeks, please notice that there will be double sessions from Monday 27 Nov to Friday 1 Dec, and sessions in the morning from Monday 4 Dec to Friday 8 Dec 2017.
27 Nov-08 Dec 2017
8:45am - 11:45am At Classroom #6
The Kurds between Past and Present Genocides in Iraq: Fresh Hopes or New Tragedies?
Optional
Mohammed Ihsan

2 credits
2 weeks
15-26 Jan 2018
At Classroom #3
International Migration and Human Rights (3 credits)
Mandatory
José Riera-Cézanne
(United States)
3 credits
3 weeks
15 Jan-02 Feb 2018
At Council Room
Regional Mechanisms for Human Rights Protection (3 credits)
Mandatory
Frans Jacobus Viljoen
(South Africa)
Jorge Francisco Calderón Gamboa
(Mexico)
Julie Diane Recinos
(USA)
María Pía Carazo Ortiz
(Costa Rica)
3 credits
3 weeks
7-27 Feb 2018
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Classroom #3
Human Rights Reporting, Monitoring, and Evaluation
Mandatory
Jan Arno Hessbruegge
(Germany)
3 credits
3 weeks
5-23 Mar 2018
8:45am - 11:45am At Classroom #1
Human Rights, Dignity and Peace: Reconceptualizing the World Citizenship through the Work of Hannah Arendt
Optional
Jana Lozanoska
(Macedonia)
1 credits
1 weeks
2-6 Apr 2018
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Classroom #1
International Law and the Rule of Law (2 credits)
Mandatory
Joaquín González Ibañez
(Spain)
2 credits
2 weeks
2-13 Apr 2018
8:45am - 11:45am At Classroom #1
Working in Conflict and Post-Conflict Areas - Field Training
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
2 credits
1 week
16-20 Apr 2018
8:45 a.m. - 4:15 p.m. At Council Room
Protection of Refugees (1 credit)
Mandatory
Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
(Costa Rica)
1 credits
1 week
2-8 May 2018
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Council Room
International Labour Law
Mandatory
ILO Team -
(Costa Rica)
1 credits
1 weeks
9-15 May 2018
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Council Room
Indigenous People´s Rights (1 credit)
Mandatory
Mihir Kanade
(India)
1 credits
1 weeks
16-22 May 2018
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Council Room
The United Nations System and UPMUNC (Part II)
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
1 credits
1 weeks
28-30 May 2018
8:45 a.m. - 4:15 p.m. At Council Room
Globalization and Human Rights
Mandatory
Mihir Kanade
(India)
3 credits
3 weeks
4-22 Jun 2018
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Classroom #2
Graduation Project: ISP-Thesis (8 credits) or Internship (8 credits) or Capstone (5 credits).
Mandatory
UPEACE Resident Faculty

8 credits
8 weeks
25 Jun-31 Dec 2018



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COURSE DESCRIPTION

The UPEACE Foundation Course provides a critical and concise introduction to the broad field of “Peace Studies” for students in ALL UPEACE programs. It initially addresses key conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of the origins and development of peace studies as an interdisciplinary area within the fields of international relations and political economy. Based on a critical analysis of policies, strategies, institutions, organizations and movements, the course then examines a range of core issues, dimensions, perspectives and paradigms for understanding the root causes of conflicts and violence and constructive strategies to address them and build peace in contemporary global, international, regional, national and local contexts. The core concepts include militarization, disarmament and arms control; human rights violations and promotion; gender inequalities, gender-based violence and gender mainstreaming; structural violence, human security, development and globalization; environmental sustainability; corporate social responsibility; international law in conflict and peacebuilding; cultural and religious identities; media’s role in conflict and peacebuilding; strategies of nonviolence; and peace education. This Foundations course will be essential in catalyzing the awareness, understanding and motivation of UPEACE students in diverse academic programs to relate, ground and intersect their specific areas of academic and practitioner interest with core theoretical, conceptual and analytical ideas in peace studies.

Contemporary international life has become unthinkable without the existence of public international law. Increasingly, international relations have become juridified, while more and more actors (international organizations, individuals, groups, NGOs, and corporations) participate in norm creation, implementation and enforcement. And, as humanity faces unprecedented challenges, the call for more cooperation and regulation is undiminished. This course offers a comprehensive overview of the topic of public international law. It provides students with a broad introduction that will focus on laying a firm foundation of knowledge about the most important doctrines and topics in this field. It will provide students with a solid grasp of the vocabulary of international law (sources, jurisdiction, responsibility, enforcement, etc.), as well as a sense of the context in which international law originates and operates and an understanding of the legal and political institutions that play a role in international law and dispute settlement. Students will also be introduced to the methods prevalent in international legal argumentation as well as the methodology for researching international law. Finally, the course will analyze a broad range of contemporary issues that are dealt with using international legal tools, such as peace and security, the use of force, human rights, humanitarian law, diplomatic and consular protection, migration, and climate change, amongst others.

The pursuit of an elusive peace for humanity has been one of the major driving forces for the establishment of international organisations throughout History. The struggled for maintenance of peace and peaceful settlement of disputes have been the most important aim of most Humanity. Two world wars have been needed, however, to institute finally an international organisation committed itself essentially “to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small, to establish conditions under which justice and respect for the obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law can be maintained, and to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom”  The United Nations emerged in 1945 as a stronger and wiser international organisation resolved to avoid the circumstances that led to the failure of its predecessor, the League of Nations.

After 70 years of its foundation, the historical, socio-political and economic development circumstances of the world have changed and with them, the UN has evolved towards a contemporary new architecture reflected in the adoption of an organisational philosophy able to respond to the current necessities of the world particularly on the subjects related to pacific settlement, collective security and development. One of the most important changes relates to the new criteria about Peace. In the world of former UN Secretary General Ban Ki Mon “Building peace is about much more than ending war. It is about putting in place the institutions and trust that will carry people forward into a peaceful future. We often have a limited window of opportunity in which to do this.”

Human Rights form one of the most important branches of international law in the contemporary world. The Holocaust and the atrocities of World War II brought about the recognition of human rights as a matter of concern to the international community. Today, all states have assumed obligations under international treaties that guarantee a wide range of rights to human beings, both in times of peace and in conflict. Further obligations for states and other actors emerge from customary human rights law. Under the aegis of the United Nations and regional organizations, several bodies have been established to monitor violations of rights of human beings. Despite these efforts, we continue to live in a world where many face rampant abuse of their human rights.

This course introduces participants to the international legal regime for the protection of human rights. The course will cover a broad spectrum of issues in human rights protection, beginning with the sources of human rights in international law and ending with contemporary challenges thereto. We will explore the core human rights instruments, the enforcement mechanisms established under international law and will also give special attention to the rights of vulnerable persons and groups.

In addition, we will pay close attention to debates regarding the theoretical and legal workability of the international human rights system. Are human rights truly ‘universal’? Are some human rights more important than others? How can human rights norms be applied to non-traditional actors, such as corporations and terrorist groups? Do new ‘group rights’ strengthen or undermine human rights? These questions and many more will guide and deepen our understanding of the principles underpinning the human rights regime, and the way that law works and does not work in the world of human rights protection.

Every communication technology presents different benefits and challenges for the protection of the right to freedom of expression, and the Internet is not the exception. Internet-based platforms provide innumerable possibilities to seek, receive, and impart information without limitations and regardless the frontiers. The current media landscape is affecting the form in which the human right to freedom of expression is exercised. This course discusses this situation and provides students with the necessary skills to promote and guarantee this right in the digital era.

In order to do that, the course starts with the analysis of the social organization. The Network Society theory will be used as a framework to understand the importance of information and communication technologies (ICT), and why people are highly dependent on the Internet. After, the course continues with the identification of the legal instruments protecting the right to freedom of expression. Students will identify the main obligations derived from International Human Rights Law, they will analyse how states should promote the simultaneous protection of competing rights, and they will discuss some of the most relevant topics in this field nowadays (i.e. protection of journalists, dissemination of hate speech, war on terror, and the role of Internet Services Providers). After this class, students will have the necessary skills to promote the exercise of the right to freedom of expression and to defend it in case of violations.

This course introduces students to the public international law dimensions of conflicts and peace. It explores the international legal standards, both in treaty law and in customary international law, that underpin the prevention, management and resolution of inter-state and intra-state conflicts. Students will specifically be introduced to jus ad bellum (Law of War and use of force), jus in bello (International Humanitarian Law), and the responsibility to protect (R2P) doctrine. The course adopts a diverse range of approaches in order to examine the rules, procedures, successes and failures of key international organizations, including the United Nations, as well as regional organizations, in responding to peace and conflict situations. The course will explore several case studies of actual policy responses, or lack thereof. Participants will also learn about the limits that international law places on states and non-state actors in peace and conflict situations, before moving into a critical discussion on the debates surrounding enforcement of those standards in international law. Finally, the course will explore how international law intersects with other areas of inquiry related to peace and conflict studies, in order to promote multi-pronged responses to peace and conflict situations.

This course introduces students to the struggles of Kurds in the context of genocides committed against
them in the past as well as in the current ongoing conflict against ISIS. It explores the Kurdish national
movement  and  its  prospects  and  challenges.  At  the  end  of  the  course,  the  students  will  have  an understanding of the history of the Kurds in the Middle East with specific emphasis on the Kurds of Iraq from the birth of Kurdish nationalism to the present day. The first session will offer an overview of the history of the Kurds and their relation with the succeeding Iraqi governments. The second session will cover the history of genocides in Iraq against the Kurds and other minorities exploring the causes and the consequences for the political and social stability of the area. The third session will focus on the heritage that this culture of violence has created in the area and the genocides committed by ISIS. The fourth session will discuss the future of Iraq and the Kurds in the context of the Middle East. The last session will explore which is the future of Iraq as a country after the liberation of Mosul and the new balance of power born from the end of the war with ISIS and the definitive collapse of the order established in 1916 with the Sykes-Picot Agreement.

The world is changing. Some argue that there are signs showing that the world order established after World War II will cease to be and be replaced by a new one. Many recent developments point towards an erosion of democratic and human rights values. Is there a risk that the human rights protection systems become diluted and irrelevant? Human rights bodies perform their duties in the context of today’s political developments. How are they faring? Are they doing a good job? Are they efficient in promoting and protecting human rights?

The main objective of this course is to provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of international and regional human rights systems. The course aims to familiarize the students with the governing norms, institutions and procedures of universal and regional mechanisms for human rights protection and promotion. This shall be done in a comparative manner. Current challenges and difficulties of the regional and international systems, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, will also be addressed.

The course starts with a general introduction to the international human rights protection mechanisms. This will be followed by an introduction and overview of the European, Inter-American and African human rights systems. We will also focus on issues such as gross violations, vulnerable groups, rights of minorities, and economic, social and cultural rights, among others.

This course introduces students to the methodology and basic techniques of human rights field work used by practitioners, whether working with the United Nations, other inter-governmental organizations, national human rights institutions or non-governmental organisations. Students will gain the necessary skills required in human rights reporting, monitoring, fact-finding and evaluation. Techniques for information gathering, fact-finding, and mainstreaming human rights-based approaches in analyzing and reporting will be introduced. Students will also learn about the strategic uses of reporting in a range of formal and informal settings, including in human rights advocacy, policy making, and monitoring situations. Attention is given to human rights based programming, as well as the tools for monitoring and evaluation of interventions or projects aimed at protecting or promoting human rights. The course is hands-on and will be based on a number of practical exercises.

We do live in dark times with various ongoing challenges, and this kind of complexity requires comprehensive approach in analyzing, examining and re-thinking the realities of 21st century. The main framework of the course will be the political theory of Hannah Arendt, who not only provided us with the meaningful idea of human dignity, but as well with a critique on the contemporary human rights. The importance of the Hannah Arendt’s work is that it addresses and relates to various ongoing challenges and threats (statelessness, rightlessness, refugees, crimes against humanity, totalitarianism, ideologies, propaganda, etc.) by offering profound insights and understandings of what “Citizen of the World” entails.
In that direction, the course follows an interdisciplinary approach involving several fields of studies such as: human rights (political and philosophical origins); gender, cultural and peace studies. It offers a re-examination of concepts such as human rights, dignity, justice, equality and peace along with the idea of “world citizenship” - worldliness or the cosmopolitan idea of humanity, as an answer to the ongoing challenges, discourses and trends. The main aim of the course will be to provide a re-thinking of human rights in the 21st century, as a way of addressing not only the growing “rightlessness” and “statelessness” and massive violations of human rights, but also to offer an understanding of the importance of the concepts of “dignity” and “world citizenship”, as central to human rights and peace.

This course is intended as a practical field exercise in conflict situations, as well as an academic seminar. The students will receive a basic training on how situations of stress or crisis influence them in a mental, physical, and professional ways. A series of scenarios drawn from contemporary conflict situations are presented to the participants as they simulate the work of journalists, NGO personnel and members of international organisations.

TOPICS COVERED
• Origin, history, mandate and objectives of the ILO
• Standards related activities and subjects cover by International Labour Standards
• Applying and promoting International Labour Standards
• Content of Fundamental Conventions: Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining, Child Labour, Discrimination and Forced Labour
• Other Topics: Employment, HIV/AIDS, Indigenous People, Social Security

LEARNING OBJECTIVE
• Put the mandate and objectives of the ILO in the context of current international challenges
• Develop a deeper reflection and understanding of issues relating to the effective application and compliance with international labour standards (Fundamental Conventions, Employment, HIV/AIDS, Indigenous Peoples Rights and Social Security).

This course introduces participants to the increasingly significant field of indigenous peoples' rights and looks at the contemporary issues that have paradoxically led to recognition of those rights on the one hand, while simultaneously challenging their implementation on the other. The course will address the broad spectrum of issues involved in the field of indigenous peoples' rights, beginning with who qualifies to be "indigenous peoples", the scope of their right to self-determination, the international and regional legal frameworks for the protection of their rights and the challenges associated therewith, and the debates surrounding the concept of indigenous governance. The course will also look closely into human security and human development issues relating to indigenous peoples, the impact of State policies on their culture and language, the issue of genetic research in the context of indigenous peoples and the effect of intellectual property rights on the traditional knowledge of indigenous peoples. Strong emphasis will be placed throughout the course not only on theory and law, but also on case studies from around the world. Students will explore debates on mainstreaming versus autonomy, participatory governance, scope of 'free and prior consent', amongst others.

The UPEACE Model United Nations Conference (UPMUNC) is a graduate-level simulation of the real United Nations Organization, its most important specialized agencies, and other associated organizations. UPMUNC provides a common platform for UPEACE students and participants from several other universities to discuss international affairs and to gain a greater understanding of the procedures of the United Nations. Participants become familiar with key global issues by becoming part of the international decision making process to resolve them, and in so doing, are given an opportunity to apply their skills in negotiations, public speaking, and diplomacy.

The 21st century is described as the age of globalization, a phenomenon which is increasingly affecting human beings in every aspect of their lives. While globalization has undoubtedly resulted in significant economic and social integration at the global level, the pace at which it is occurring has also brought with it several unintended consequences for the respect and promotion of human rights at other levels. The principal institutions facilitating this phenomenon such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and the World Trade Organization, have often been accused of keeping human rights issues out of their respective domains. Business Corporations also have been accused of undermining human rights, and at times even being complicit in gross violations. An important feature of globalization is its nexus with development policies in our contemporary world, including the newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals, development aid, regulation of infectious diseases, movement of people etc., often with regressive effects.
The critical challenge facing the present world order, therefore, lies in ensuring that the vehicles of globalization are oriented towards development and promotion of human rights, through appropriate laws and policies. This course will introduce students to the major themes and debates concerning these different linkages between globalization and human rights and explore the new streams of critique that have enabled a confluence as well as a questioning of the globalization-human rights interface.

The Graduation Project is a concluding academic requirement intended to be a comprehensive and capstone outcome of the student educational performance. It is a higher academic exercise that enables the student to demonstrate the ability to identify a problem, determine an academic objective to address it and utilize an appropriate methodology to attain such objective. The Graduation Project is also intended to demonstrate the student’s ability to write and critically develop a professional and scholarly report. 

The Graduation Project can be fulfilled through one of the following modalities:

•Thesis:  8 credits
•Internship: 8 credits (3 months)
•Capstone: 5 credits*

Graduation Project Guidelines with detail information of each modality will be provided by your Academic Department.

*NOTE: Students who choose Capstone as Graduation Project must take an extra 3-credit course according the following options:
1.One additional course (face to face modality), which means taking 2 parallel regular master courses (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) if approved by the student's MA Programme Coordinator
2.One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality), which means taking 2 or 3 parallel courses (one face-to-face master course and one 3 credit course or two 2-credit courses approved by the student's Programme Coordinator) before June 2016
3.One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality) extended from June 2016 until December 2016 (the online course or courses must be approved by the student's Programme Coordinator)



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FACULTY

Alonso Muñoz is Instructor in the Department of Environment and Development at the University for Peace, where he coordinates the Master of Arts (MA) degree in Responsible Management and Sustainable Economic Development (RMSED). He holds a BSc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Costa Rica and a Msc. in Business Administration. He has worked in the private sector as a consultant and as an entrepreneur, and has volunteered on various national and international projects regarding peace education, migration, environmental impact of systems and Social Enterprises. He is a novelist, a blogger, a peace advocate, an entrepreneur and passionate about social and environmental development.

Frans Viljoen obtained the degrees LLB, MA (in Afrikaans literature) and LLD (on the African regional human rights system) from the University of Pretoria (UP); and the degree LLM from Cambridge University.  In October 2007, he was appointed as Director of the Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria. He is also the academic co-ordinator of the LLM (Human Rights and Democratisation in Africa), presented by the Centre, in collaboration with seven partner law faculties across Africa. He is also the author of numerous articles, especially dealing with human rights issues, and International human rights law in Africa. He is editor-in-chief of the African Human Rights Law Journal and co-editor of the English and French versions of the African Human Rights Law Reports

Resident Professor and Academic Coordinator of Peace Education Programme
Heather Kertyzia is currently Resident Professor and Academic Coordinator of Peace Education Master Programme at the University for Peace. She is also an assistant professor of Negotiation, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding at California State University Dominguez Hills. She focuses on peace education, working with teachers in participatory action research to create more peaceful secondary schools. As a former secondary school teacher, Heather understands the importance of the local community in building more socially, economically and environmentally just educational spaces. As an interdisciplinary student and scholar, she has worked with communities throughout the Americas, with a recent focus on partnering with local grassroots organizations in Nicaragua.

Dr. Héctor Olásolo Alonso (Spain) Law and Doctorate degrees, Salamanca University (Spain); LL.M., Columbia University (USA). Chair in International Law and Director of the International Law Clinic at the University of El Rosario (Colombia); Chairman of the Ibero-American Institute of The Hague for Peace, Human Rights and International Justice (The Netherlands); Ad Hoc Professor at the Hague University for Applied Sciences (The Netherlands); and Director of the Anuario Ibero-Americano de Derecho Internacional Penal (ANIDIP). Prof. Olasolo has been Legal Officer at the International Criminal Court (2004-2010) and the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (2002-2004), Expert Witness before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights; External Advisor to the Special Tribunal for Lebanon; Member of the UN roster for the appointment of International Magistrates at the Extraordinary Chambers of the Courts of Cambodia; and Chair in International Criminal Law at Utrecht University (2010-2012). He has published fifteen monographs and over sixty articles and chapters of books in Spanish and English.
The only tripartite U.N. agency, since 1919 the ILO brings together governments, employers and workers representatives of 187 member States ?, to set labour standards, develop policies and devise programmes promoting decent work for all women and men. The main aims of the ILO are to promote rights at work, encourage decent employment opportunities, enhance social protection and strengthen dialogue on work-related issues.
Jan Hessbruegge is taking a sabbatical leave from the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). Since 2005, he has worked as a United Nations human rights officer for the United Nations, where he worked for the Office of the High Commissioner on Human Rights, United Nations peacekeeping missions in Sudan and Haiti, the Commissions of Inquiry on Human Rights in Syria and North Korea, the Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women and the Representative of the Secretary-General on Internally Displaced Persons. He holds a law degree from the University of Muenster in Germany, a Master of Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School and the Diploma in Public International Law of the Hague Academy of International Law. Jan is currently pursuing a doctorate in international law at the European University Viadrina in Frankfurt (Oder), Germany.
Jan Breitling is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environment and Development at University for Peace. He holds a BSc. in Tropical Forestry, from the Technological Institute of Costa Rica, and a MSc. in Environmental Sciences from WUR Wageningen University and Research Center, The Netherlands. His research interests include root causes of deforestation and Global Environmental Change, and Environmental Governance, specifically market based approaches addressing biodiversity conservation and Climate Change.
Jana Lozanoska, LL.M in international humanitarian law from the University of Geneva, is a Doctoral Candidate at the University for Peace. Her research is a critique on human rights that is based on the idea of human dignity as proposed by the German-Jewish political theorist Hannah Arendt. Her current research interests are in the field of human rights, political theory and political philosophy. Her professional career of twelve years is a combination of academia, research and policy area. She served as an Adviser to the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Macedonia for two years. She had contributed frequently as regular columnist in several daily newspapers in Macedonia. Lozanoska had published three poetry books and one novel. She continues to research and publish on issues related to international law, human rights, gender and LGBT, regional and international organizations. Follow her doctoral research blog at: https://rethinkinghumanity.wordpress.com/

Dr. Joaquín Gonzalez Ibanez is Director of the LLM on Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law Institute at the Sergio Arboleda University in Bogota, as well as Associate Professor of International Law at both the Universidad Pontificia Comillas, and the Alfonso X El Sabio University in Madrid. He received a Fulbright-Schuman Award in 2008, and was Research Fellow at the Washington College of Law, American University, where he carried out research on the different post-9/11 visions of international human rights by Europe and the United States. Prof. Gonzalez Ibanez has served as Dean, Social Studies Faculty, at Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, Madrid. He holds an LLB and a Doctorate in Law (SJD) from Universidad Complutense, Madrid; a post-graduate Certificate in International Public Law from the International Institute of Law at The Hague; a postgraduate Certificate in Human Rights Protection from the Rene Cassin Institute of Human Rights in Strasbourg; and a Diploma in European Law and International Affairs from the Catholic University of Louvain (KULeuven), Belgium. He has been a visiting professor in China, Colombia, Italy and the United States, as visiting scholar and researcher at the Euroepan Law Center, Harvard Law School, and has published extensively on human right issues, specifically the right to access to education. His latest edited publication, International Protection of Human Rights and Rule of Law, represents a collective work of 38 authors, including Claudio Grossman, Judge Baltasar Garzon, Richard Wilson, Jamin B. Raskin, Guy Harpaz, Emiliano Garcia Coso, and Fabian Salvioli.. He is currently co-director of the Berg Institute, Human Righst, Sustainability and democracy. www.berg-institute.org

He is currently a Senior Legal Officer at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, where he has worked since 2007. He obtained his law degree (JD equivalent) at the Universidad Iberoamericana (UIA), Mexico City, and an LL.M. degree in International Legal Studies at American University-Washington College of Law in 2007. He has also undertaken specialized studies in international criminal law at Leiden University. In Mexico, Jorge was active in different NGOs and worked on several community projects with indigenous peoples. He also worked as a Deputy Visitor at the Human Rights Commission of Mexico City (Ombudsman). He was a Research Assistant at the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law and an intern at Human Rights First in Washington, D.C, and Seconded Jurist at the ECHR in France. He has been a Professor on Human Rights at the University of Costa Rica (UCR) and in other international Masters programs in the Americas, as well as lectured in different countries in the Americas, Europe, and Africa. He is author of several articles on international human rights.
Professor José Riera-Cézanne is Adjunct Professor in the Department of International Law at UPEACE as well as an international consultant (United Nations and non-governmental organizations). He joined UPEACE in 2017 following 32 years of distinguished service with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), most recently as Special Adviser to the Assistant UN High Commissioner for Refugees (Protection), Mr. Volker Türk. Professor Riera-Cézanne is a seasoned expert in multilateral consultations and negotiations relating to refugees and other populations who are of concern to UNHCR and to the United Nations, as well humanitarian issues more broadly. He brings to UPAZ his in-depth knowledge of international refugee law and protection issues; international humanitarian law and norms relating to the protection of the world’s growing number of internally displaced persons; international law relating to statelessness and nationality; human rights law; international migration and efforts to improve global governance of international migration and refugee flows; international migration and human rights; comprehensive refugee response frameworks as called for in the United Nations General Assembly’s New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants of 2016; climate change and its ramifications for migration, displacement and planned relocation of affected populations; humanitarian accountability; evaluations of humanitarian assistance; fund raising from Governments, Foundations and others; and the UN’s cooperation with faith-based actors in development and humanitarian interventions. Professor Riera-Cézanne holds degrees from Yale College (BA cum laude, SY ’77), Columbia Law School (JD ’81), the Parker School of Foreign and International Law (Certificate in Foreign and International Law ‘81). He has also worked towards a doctorate from the Graduate Institute in Geneva, Switzerland, and studied at The Hague Academy of International Law (Private international law and Public international law). His principal area of academic research is documenting the impacts of climate change on human mobility and identifying effective adaptation strategies and State policies to promote them. He has lectured in a number of universities over the years, including the NATO School, (Germany) the University of Washington (USA) and the University of Groningen (Neth.). Lectures and presentations Contribution to the United Nations Global Compact on Refugees: Lessons from the 1989 International Conference on Refugees in Central America (CIREFCA), UNHCR-organized meeting on “Towards a global compact on refugees”, Thematic discussion 1 on Past and current burden- and responsibility-sharing arrangements, Palais des Nations, Geneva, 10 July 2017 Recent Developments in International Governance of International Migration and Refugee Flows: The New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants, Lecture at the University of Washington, Faculty of Geography and Migration, 27 February 2017 (Unpublished – available upon request) The UN’s Cooperation with Faith-based Actors: Recent Developments, Lecture at the University of Washington, Faculty of Geography and Migration, 27 February 2017 (Unpublished – available upon request)
Julie Diane Recinos is a senior coordinating attorney at the InterAmerican Court of Human Rights, where she has worked since 2008. She holds a BA in history and political science magna cum laude from the University of Florida and a JD cum laude from the University of Notre Dame, both in the US. She has also undertaken advanced studies in human rights at the University of Oxford, UK, and has written and taught on international human rights instruments and standards in various academic and governmental institutions around the world. She specializes in gender rights.

Head, Dept. of Peace and Conflict Studies, Resident Professor and Academic Coordinator of International Peace Studies Programme and International Peace Studies with specialization in Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Programme
Dr. Manish Thapa is Head of the Department of Peace and Conflict Studies and Resident Professor of International Peace Studies Master Programme at the University for Peace. He is one of the founding members of Department of Conflict, Peace & Development Studies at Tribhuvan University Nepal (2007-2015). He is also currently Visiting Professor at the Institute of International Relations, University of Warsaw, Poland and Senior Research Fellow at Center for Europe – University of Warsaw- Poland. He received his Post Doctorate in International Relations from the University of Warsaw. He has served as Research Fellow in several universities and institutes in Europe and North America such as the University of Warsaw; Department of Peace & Conflict Research, Uppsala University; Brown University; McGill-Echenberg Human Rights Fellow & Jeanne Sauvé Scholar, McGill University; Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame. His publications include 6 books and numerous journal articles and book chapters including "Foreign Policy in the Global South: Anti-Westernism, Rhetoric and Identity" (Co-editor), London: Routledge 2017 (Forthcoming - In Press); "From Bullet to Ballot – Peacemaking and Peacebuilding in Nepal: Lessons Learned and Unlearned" (Editor), London: Routledge 2017 (Proposal accepted); “Internal Conflicts & Peacebuilding Challenges" (Editor), New Delhi: K W Publishers 2016 and "India in the Contemporary World: Polity, Economy and International Relations" (Co-editor), London: Routledge 2014.

María Pía Carazo Ortiz (Costa Rica) has a Law degree from the University of Costa Rica (1996) and an LL.M. degree from the University of Heidelberg, Germany (1999). She is currently completing her Ph.D., also at the University of Heidelberg. Her areas of research include fundamental issues of Public International Law, Refugee Law, International Criminal Law, Transitional Justice, Human Rights (with an emphasis on regional protection systems) and Comparative Legal Studies (specially of Latin America, Spain, Portugal and Germany). Among her previous work experience she worked as a junior research fellow at Max-Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg, Germany. She has also lectured and taught at different institutions, including the University of Bonn, Germany.

Mariateresa Garrido is Teaching Assistant and a Doctoral Student at UPEACE. She holds two Master's Degrees one from UPEACE in International Law and the Settlement of the Disputes and one from the Central University of Venezuela in International Law. Prior to her Master's Degree she had been working in promoting and defending human rights in Venezuela with different organizations such as Transparency International and Espacio Publico. Her principal research area is related to freedom of expression and safety of journalists.

Mayumi Yamada (Ph.D.).
Resident Professor and Head of Doctoral Programme

Dr. Mayumi Yamada is Resident Professor and Head of the Doctoral Programme of the UN Mandated University for Peace (UPEACE) in Costa Rica. Prior to joining UPEACE, she worked as the Recovery, Reintegration & Peace Building Officer of United Nations Mission in South Sudan. During the December Crisis 2013 in South Sudan, she remained as a life-saving staff, directly managing one of the biggest Protection of Civilians sites by supporting humanitarian assistance. Before joining UNMISS, she worked with UNDP Offices in Kazakhstan (Semipalatinsk: ex-nuclear testing sites), Maldives, Lao PDR and Solomon Islands, and the UN Centre for Regional Development (Disaster Management Planning Unit). She holds a Ph.D. Degree in Sustainable Development from Imperial College London, UK. She is originally from Kobe (Japan), who survived from the Great Hanshin- Awaji Earthquake in 1995.

Dr. Mihir Kanade (India) is the Academic Coordinator of UPEACE, the Head of its Department of International Law, and the Director of the UPEACE Human Rights Centre. He holds an LL.B. from Nagpur University (India) and a Master degree and Doctorate from UPEACE. He is also an adjunct faculty at Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio (Spain), Cheikh Anta Diop University (Senegal), and Long Island University (United States). His principal area of academic research and study is International Law, Human Rights and Globalization, covering several themes within that interface including trade and investment, sustainable development, forced migration, indigenous peoples’ rights, public health, amongst others. He has extensive experience in training staff of inter-governmental, governmental and non-governmental organizations, as well as professionals, in the field of human rights. He acts as an advisor to several human rights organizations and corporations on issues related to international law and human rights. He serves on the International Advisory Board of the International Bar Association on the topic of Business and Human Rights. He also leads a project of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on promoting the Right to Development. Prior to his pursuit in academia, Mihir practiced for several years as a lawyer at the Bombay High Court and at the Supreme Court of India.
Dr. Miriam Estrada-Castillo (Ecuador) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of International Law. Prior to joining UPEACE, Dr. Estrada-Castillo worked as the Senior legal and political officer in the United Nations Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED). Prior to that position, she has worked with the UN system in various capacities, including as the International Prosecutor General, UN Peacekeeping Mission for East-Timor (DPKO), Expert and Vice-Chairperson of the Monitoring Committee of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), Chief of Field of the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, and the Latin America Regional Adviser on Gender, Human Rights and Culture of Peace for UNESCO. She has also worked as the President of the Ecuadorian Supreme Court of Juvenile Justice and as the Minister of Social Affairs in Ecuador. In her academic life, she worked recently as the Director of Master Degree Courses on Gender and the Law and Children in Armed Conflict, Lund University, Sweden. She is a Visiting Professor of the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law (RWI) and has also taught courses as a Visiting Professor at the Australian National University. She is the author of the Ecuadorian Law on Violence against Women and of the first Legislation for Minors and Family in the country.

Instructor, Liason, Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Specialization and Editor, Peace and Conflict Monitor and Peace and Conflict Review Ross Ryan holds degrees in political science and literature from McMaster University, Canada and the M.A. degree in environmental security from the University for Peace, Costa Rica. He is chief editor of the Peace and Conflict Monitor and managing editor of the Peace and Conflict Review, as well as instructor in the department of peace studies and liaison officer of the media, peace and conflict studies specialization. He is currently working on a research project entitled “Information Technology, Civic Engagement, and the Cyber-Ethnography of Peace Movements”.

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