Academic Course Calendar - Sustainable Peace in the Contemporary World - 2016 - 2017

Courses and Teachers
2016 - 2017 - Sustainable Peace in the Contemporary World
Course listings are continously updated with new information
Courses Teacher Credits # Weeks Dates
United Nations System
Optional
Miriam Estrada
(Ecuador)
3 credits
9 weeks
12 Sep-11 Nov 2016
Peace and Conflict Studies; The Foundation Course
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
Virginia Cawagas
(Philippines/Canada)
3 credits
9 weeks
12 Sep-11 Nov 2016
Disarmament: Towards Maintenance of International Peace and Security
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada
(Ecuador)
2 credits
6 weeks
07 Nov-16 Dec 2016
Workshop on Negotiation and Mediation Skills
Optional
Amr Abdalla
(Egypt)
Lilya Hazal Akay
(Germany)
2 credits
6 weeks
07 Nov-16 Dec 2016
Peace and Sports
Optional
Gal Harmat
(Israel)
Gal Peleg Laniado
(Israel)
2 credits
6 weeks
07 Nov-16 Dec 2016
Fundraising for Sustainable Development
Optional
Juergen Carls
(Germany)
2 credits
6 weeks
07 Nov-16 Dec 2016
Research Methodology
Mandatory
Amr Abdalla
(Egypt)
3 credits
9 weeks
09 Jan-10 Mar 2017
Sustainable Development Goals
Optional
Mihir Kanade
(India)
2 credits
6 weeks
16 Jan-24 Feb 2017
Human Vulnerability and Climate Change Adaptation
Optional
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
2 credits
6 weeks
16 Jan-24 Feb 2017
Nonviolent Transformation of Conflicts
Optional
Mary E. King
(United States)
2 credits
6 weeks
16 Jan-24 Feb 2017
Global Governance
Optional
Mihir Kanade
(India)
2 credits
6 weeks
06 Mar-14 Apr 2017
Transitional Justice
Optional
Miriam Estrada
(Ecuador)
2 credits
6 weeks
06 Mar-14 Apr 2017
International Law, Borders and Conflicts
Optional
Juan Carlos Sainz-Borgo
(Venezuela)
2 credits
6 weeks
06 Mar-14 Apr 2017
Security Sector Reform
Optional
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
2 credits
2 weeks
06 Mar-14 Apr 2017
Gender and Peacebuilding
Mandatory
Gal Harmat
(Israel)
3 credits
9 weeks
10 Apr-09 Jun 2017
Terrorism and Transnational Organized Crime
Optional
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
3 credits
9 weeks
10 Apr-09 Jun 2017
Peacekeeping Operations
Optional
TBA .

2 credits
6 weeks
17 Apr-26 May 2017
Religion/Faith, Conflict and Peacebuilding
Optional
Toh Swee-Hin (S. H. Toh)
(Australia/Canada)
2 credits
6 weeks
17 Apr-26 May 2017
World Politics
Mandatory
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
3 credits
9 weeks
12 Jun-11 Aug 2017
International Law Dimensions of Peace and Conflicts
Optional
Mihir Kanade
(India)
3 credits
9 weeks
12 Jun-11 Aug 2017
Media, Peace, and Conflict
Optional
Daniela Ingruber
(Austria)
2 credits
6 weeks
19 Jun-28 Jul 2017
Human Security
Optional
Miriam Estrada
(Ecuador)
2 credits
6 weeks
19 Jun-28 Jul 2017
Implementing Projects and Local Capacity Building
Optional
Gal Harmat
(Israel)
2 credits
6 weeks
07 Aug-15 Sep 2017
Conflict Analysis
Optional
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
3 credits
9 weeks
07 Aug-06 Oct 2017
Leading Strategies for Change
Optional
Rolain Borel
(Switzerland)
2 credits
6 weeks
07 Aug-15 Sep 2017
Globalization and Human Rights
Optional
Mihir Kanade
(India)
2 credits
2 weeks
07 Aug-15 Sep 2017
Environment, Development and Peace
Optional
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
2 credits
6 weeks
07 Aug-15 Sep 2017
Independent Research Project
Mandatory
TBD .

6 credits
1
20-20 Dec 2017



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COURSE DESCRIPTION

Ever since its establishment in 1945, the United Nations has played a pivotal role in a great variety of affairs, large or small, international and national. As such, the UN has played an incisive role in the lives of people around the world. Much of what the UN does is taken for granted and even goes unnoticed by the larger public, even as an oft quoted saying argues that ‘if the UN did not exist it would have to be invented’. At the same time, millions around the world look to the UN expecting it to address many of the enormous challenges faced by humankind. These complex dynamics are complemented by the fact that the UN is both reliant on what the member states want, while at the same time, being much more than the sum of its members. This course provides a comprehensive and rigorous introduction into the UN system, including its origins and history, its organizational framework and the functioning of various organs, agencies, bodies and programmes. 

The UPEACE Foundation Course provides a critical and concise introduction to the broad field of “Peace Studies” for students in ALL UPEACE programmes. It initially addresses key conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of the origins and development of peace studies as an interdisciplinary area within the fields of international relations and political economy. Based on a critical analysis of policies, strategies, institutions, organizations and movements, the course then examines a range of core issues, dimensions, perspectives and paradigms for understanding the root causes of conflicts and violence and constructive strategies to address them and build peace in contemporary global, international, regional, national and local contexts. The core concepts include militarization, disarmament and arms control; human rights violations and promotion; gender inequalities, gender-based violence and gender mainstreaming; structural violence, human security, development and globalization; environmental sustainability; corporate social responsibility; international law in conflict and peacebuilding; cultural and religious identities; media’s role in conflict and peacebuilding; strategies of nonviolence; and peace education. This Foundations course will be essential in catalyzing the awareness, understanding and motivation of UPEACE students in diverse academic programmes to relate, ground and intersect their specific areas of academic and practitioner interest with core theoretical, conceptual and analytical ideas in peace studies.

This course on Disarmament and Peace constitutes the first effort for approaching, in a comprehensive fashion, one of the most sensitive issues threatening the very existence of Humanity: the tangible danger of nuclear, biological, chemical and small or light weapons along with international conventions related to weapons of mass destructions, cluster Munitions and land mines, their relations with terrorism and the economic and social consequences of the arms race, as the resources devoted to huge arsenals, both-- nuclear and conventional-- restrict the amount of funds that can be devoted to science, education, environmental protection and development.

These subjects will be approached, essentially, from the role of that academia, human rights defenders and civil society must play for having a saying to  control the destruction of Humanity.

All social interactions, from personal relationships to international arena, experience opposing preferences. Hence an introductory course on the theory and practice of negotiation and mediation is essential for understanding topics as diverse as marital disputes, organizational relations, community conflicts, group decision-making and international relations. It will enhance one's ability to critically review situations in order to find and adopt a mutually accepted solution to a given situation. This course is therefore designed to serve as a broad introduction to the nature, scope, theories and practices of negotiation and mediation. The course will examine the complex and yet essential roles of negotiation and mediation as part of the main procedures of dealing with opposing preferences and as models of constructive conflict transformation. The course will set the context with a discussion on the nature, assumptions, emotions and decision-making approaches involved in negotiations, the dynamics revolving around it and the gender perspective to it. It will also examine the various objectives, considerations, essences and processes of mediation.  The course utilizes participatory and interactive pedagogies.

The course will challenge and examine the role that sports play in conflict resolution, as part of the methodology of Peace Education at large. Sport has played a constructive role in bringing two conflicting sides together. The course will confront with the questions:  What is Sport for development (and conflict resolution as a branch of this field)? What can Sport contribute to Peacbuilding? How sport can play a constructive role in conflict prevention and conflict transformation? What examples in the world should we carefully look at and learn from and is Sport alone is enough? Finally, the students will have the chance to set their own “recipe for success” through building a toolkit for using sport as a tool for conflict transformation or analyzing an international conflict zone and how sport plays (or played) a role in breaking those barriers.

The course aims at strengthening the capacity of scientists, administrators and students to respond to specific donor demands, to achieve complementary funding for projects (Project Funding) and institutions (Endowment Fund).

This is an instrumental course and systematically develops a logical framework-based project matrix, which is used by most international agencies, a concept paper, and provides an overview of potential funding sources and options.

The course is oriented towards the needs of the participants. They start the course with their own project idea in which external funding is required and finalize with concrete results such as a project planning matrix, project profile and potential donors identified to launch the project.

The central goal of this course is to provide an introduction to a variety of research approaches and methods in the social sciences. The aim of the course is to enable students to develop their own research designs as well as be able to critique the research designs of others. Students will be exposed to different research methodologies (quantitative and qualitative), and data analysis techniques.

The student in this course will be required:  to read compulsory readings and optional ones, to interact with fellow participants and instructors, listening to weekly presentations by the Instructors and most importantly, critical self-reflection. At the end of the Course, the student will have a research design that should be conducted as part of their professional work and is  an academic requirement for a course.

On 25 September, 2015, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted a new and ambitious collective global plan of action for transforming our world by 2030 through the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs, which are part and parcel of the 2030 Agenda, replace and build upon the previous Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which ran their course in 2015. The advancement of the SDGs over the MDGs is not only in its scope – there are now 17 Goals as against the previous 8 – but also in some of the known structural shortcomings in the design of targets and indicators of the MDGs.

The global agenda for development, including development aid, financing, and international cooperation, for the next 15 years will likely gravitate around the SDGs. Indeed, the 2030 Agenda calls for a convergence around the SDGs of responses to several contemporary issues of global concern, whether related to climate change, human rights, peace and security, gender equality, migration, safe cities, rule of law, good governance, education, health, multilateral trade, investment, amongst others. However, a successful implementation of the SDGs can only result from learning the lessons from the MDG story where despite admirable progress in some goals, some others unfortunately remained off-track.

This course introduces participants to the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, their improvements over the MDGs, the means of implementation, and the challenges thereto. Participants working in, or interested in working in, fields related to development, peace, human rights, environment, gender etc. will gain a comprehensive overview of this new global agenda, which more than ever, requires practitioners with the necessary knowledge, skills and tools to implement it.

The course aims at understanding the impact of climate change on the global environment and on human activity.  Climate change increases risks to human livelihoods and as such may endanger the security of individuals and groups. This in turn could increase the propensity for conflict within and between states.

Components of the course will include a critical examination of the drivers of climate change, largely induced by human activity, and a review of international efforts to limit the magnitude of climate changes, including those concluded in Kyoto and Copenhagen. Consequences of climate change for human health, for economic activity, for resource use and resource availability will also be examined, as will be the options for adapting to climate change.

The examination of climate changes will be viewed within the broader context of the current demographic, economic and political global reality. Introductory comments and discussions led by the instructor will be followed by seminars with broad student input.

Revolutionary armed conflict was once considered the only way for oppressed peoples to change severe injustice and oppression. Bloodshed was deemed necessary, often justified by the cliché that what was taken by violence can only be retrieved by violence. In the last decades of the 20th century, however, it became clear that armed insurrection is not the only choice for aggrieved groups and societies, and that nonviolent civil resistance, relying on a variety of forms of nonviolent action, could bring some impressive results. Some failures also occurred. Although this phenomenon has been coherently utilized to achieve political and social change for well over a century by groups, peoples, and societies in differing cultures and political systems, only recently has it gained respect as a potentially formidable strategic force by policy makers, political analysts, scholars, peacemakers, and international specialists of many fields.

Contemporary dictatorships and tyrants have collapsed from the pressure exerted by popular mass movements of nonviolent action, in countries such as the former Czechoslovakia, Chile, East Germany, Georgia on the Black Sea, the Philippines, Poland, Serbia, South Africa, or Ukraine, to name a few. In 2010–11, national nonviolent movements in Tunisia and Egypt changed the face of North Africa and the Middle East. Evidence  shows that countries that experience bottom-up, grass-roots nonviolent struggle are more likely to sustain human rights and democracy once established than when armed insurrection is used, and that nonviolent movements succeed more often than violent insurrections. Given this record, it is important for would-be peacemakers to explore systematically the theories, methods, dynamics, and strategies of such movements.

The contemporary global order is founded upon the principle of sovereignty of States and non-interference in each other’s domestic affairs. At the same time, there is an ever-increasing push for 'global governance' as the key to resolving issues of common concern to humanity, especially those which are transboundary in nature. But how should global governance work in the absence of a global government? Is global governance a good thing or a bad thing for humanity and the planet anyway? Recent world events have demonstrated that while elements of global governance on issues such as climate change and forced displacement might be necessary, grassroots organizations and civil society have simultaneously pushed back against ‘too much’ global governance in other areas such as trade and finance. Should we then move towards more global governance by identifying the gaps and plugging them? Or should we rather move towards restricting global governance because it is invasive and shrinks ‘governance space’ of States? This course introduces students to the various dimensions of global governance, debates on its lack of effectiveness in some areas, as well as debates on its over-regulation in some others. The course adopts a multi-disciplinary approach to unpacking this important and emerging area of global policy making. It also adopts a dynamic pedagogy included readings, multi-media content, lectures, and discussion forums.

Over the past decades, transitional justice has emerged as an interdisciplinary field of research and practice that aims to understand and advance a complex range of goals, from strengthening democratic transitions and peacebuilding processes to enabling reconciliation.

The objective of this Course is twofold: to analyse the mechanisms and trends of transitional justice in the UN post-conflict peacebuilding processes, and to clarify some of their possible impacts on the international legal order. From an inter-disciplinary perspective, the course will briefly analise the different approaches to transitional justice along with its mechanisms including trials, truth commissions, compensation programs, apologies and commemorations. 
Similarly, the course will address the investigate normative utilised by transitional justice processes and assess its effects and efficacy of the transitional justice processes. The course will finish examining the always controversial subject of amnesty.

Establishing limits between sovereignty states and its management between neighboring countries, constitutes today an unlimited source of tensions and conflicts around the world. The course provides an historical overview of the legal methods of establishing limits and the way international community deals with these situations around the globe, including law of the sea, international rivers, lakes and the International Court of Justice and International Tribunal of the Law of the Sea jurisprudence on the area.

This course provides a basic introduction to the concept of “Security Sector Reform” (SSR) which is widely recognized as a vital component of building sustainable peace in societies in post-conflict contexts. Such reform is necessary to enhance the security and safety of people and for preventing emerging or recurring crises and conflicts. Through a critical analysis of policies, procedures, programs, activities and case studies in global, regional and local contexts, the course will clarify how Governments and intergovernmental agencies can improve the provision of security, safety and justice to citizens and institutions based on the rule of law and related standards or principles of human rights, gender equality, human security, transparency, accountability, democratic participation and good governance. Specific security sector reforms to be examined include disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) programs vital in the transition from the ending of armed conflict to a peaceful societal order; reform of various law and order and defense agencies (e.g. armed forces; police; justice, national security) and the establishment of effective civilian oversight of the security system. Emphasis will also be placed in this course on major UN policy and operational areas for supporting SSR, including peacekeeping, DDR and post-conflict peacebuilding, and the role of the United Nations Inter-Agency Security Sector Reform Task Force (IASSRTF) to “promote an integrated, holistic and coherent United Nations security sector reform (SSR) approach that envisages to assist States and societies in establishing effective, inclusive and accountable security”. The civil society-led initiative of a United Nations Emergency Peace Service (UNEPS) will also be explored in terms of its potential positive contributions to international Security Sector Reform.

The course constitutes an advanced course dealing with central structural arrangements conducive towards war, militarism, hegemonic masculinities, Femininities, nationalism, conflict creation and resolution, greed, and competitiveness and its consequent violence, including violence against women. The impediments specifically created by lack of gender equity will be analyzed, an analysis that is seen as pivotal for peacekeeping in times of rapid globalization.

Some of the material assigned for the course offers specific strategies for empowerment and achieving gender equity, while representing the necessity for these strategies to be connected to a structural changes and a drastic shift away from the discourses concerning women with the terms “vulnerabilities” and victimization and about males as innately aggressive. It examines the complex relationships between gender, biology, race, class, ethnicity, nationalism, religion, sexual orientation, militarization, both in the domestic and the public spheres. The former is analyzed as a pillar for the latter. Global gender indicators will complement the above material.

The definitions of what constitutes human security have been shifting, specifically when analyzed from a clear gender perspective, assuming that: a) there is no clear boundary between war and peace for women worldwide; and b) security considerations go beyond that of relationships between States and focus on the human. The course will thus focus on peace building and peace education, as well as Gender analysis to Security and peace building.

The course will focus on terrorism and related forms of political violence from a comparative and global perspective.  It will look at definitions, the prevalence of terrorism, techniques, the choice of targets, the effects of the media, and sources of support.  The course will also look at different types of terrorist organizations including ones that are primarily seeking to attain ideological objectives, groups with an ethnic or nationalist agenda, organizations with religious motivations, and those groups with a mixture of motives that are difficult to disentangle.  A portion of the course will also look at governmental support of local terrorist groups that target citizens of their own state.  In addition, it will look at counterterrorism and counterinsurgency techniques, including the effects that such activities can have on civil liberties. Finally, the relative success or failure of terrorist groups in achieving their objectives will be evaluated as part of the process of determining what the future is likely to hold.

The second part of the course will be dedicated to provide a comprehensive and critical understanding of the expanding global problem of transnational organized crime which is undermining peace and human security, fueling internal and international conflicts or violence, accentuating human rights violations and impacting negatively on the political, economic, social and cultural development of societies worldwide. Students will draw on conceptual/ theoretical and policy analyses, research findings and case studies from diverse regions and countries to examine various forms of transnational organized crime including the illicit arms trade, money laundering, illicit drug trafficking , theft of art and cultural objects, theft of intellectual property, piracy, cybercrime, trafficking in persons, trade in human body parts, environmental crime, intellectual property theft, organized fraud, infiltration of legal business, and graft and corruption.

Among the diverse conflicts that have led to divisions and violence in historical times and in the contemporary world, some clearly involve peoples  who belong to different religions or faiths.  Such conflicts have popularly created the assumption and conclusion that religion or faith has been or is  a primary “cause” of violence and even wars. However, on careful analysis of the dynamics and complexities of the conflicts, this perspective is now being increasingly challenged. Drawing on exemplars from diverse regions and societies, this course seeks to clarify how religious and faith identities, beliefs and practices can motivate followers to engage in violent conflicts, albeit often in intersections  with diverse economic, political and social factors.  The potential for exclusivist interpretations of religious or faith “truths” to fuel extremism, intolerances, discrimination  and even violence, including “terrorism”, will also be critically analyzed .  On the other hand, there is a widening  recognition   that religion, faith and diverse spirituality traditions can play a positive role in building a culture of peace at local, national and global levels of life. The course hence will highlight the  creative nonviolent contributions of  faiths and religions in resolving and transforming conflicts and violence . Insights and lessons from strategies such as the expanding movements of interfaith and intra-faith dialogue as well as faith-based initiatives in peacebuilding will also be explored.   The course will be especially relevant to peacebuilders working in contexts of cultural and faith or religious  complexities and diversities. 

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to global politics, focusing in particular on its origins and historical evolution, its key concepts, major theoretical frameworks, main actors and institutions, the global architecture of power, and its dynamic nature in the process of globalization. More specifically, the course introduces concepts of power, statecraft, diplomacy, foreign policy, political economy and international security, and examines the evolution of global politics in the 20th and 21st centuries. The course combines the study of concepts and theories with a range of questions about global politics, such as: Why bother with theory? Why is the world divided in nation-states? How do institutions modify interests and interactions? Is the nation-state in decline? Why do wars occur? What are the causes of terrorism? What are the main global threats of the 21st century? Why war? What is the role of the United Nations in resolving conflict? These and other central questions about the nature of global political relations are examined in this course.

This course introduces participants to the international law dimensions of peace and conflicts. It explores the international legal standards, both in treaty law and in customary international law, that underpin the prevention, management and resolution of inter-state and intra-state conflicts. The course adopts a diverse range of approaches to examine the rules, procedures, successes and failures of key international organizations, including the United Nations, as well as regional organizations, in responding to peace and conflict situations. Several case studies of actual policy responses, or lack thereof, will be explored in the course. Participants will also learn about the limits that international law places on States and non-state actors in peace and conflict situations, before moving into a critical discussion on the debates surrounding lack of enforcement of those standards in international law. Finally, the course will explore how international law intersects with other areas of inquiry related to peace and conflict studies, in order to promote multi-pronged responses to peace and conflict situations.

Empowering Transformation: Strategies, Methods and Tools for Effective Capacity Building
This theoretical and practice online course is for people actively engaged in peacebuilding projects, community, national and international organizations and social movements.
Developed for peace workers, practitioners and activists, teachers engaged in community and social work, national and local people’s movements and struggles, and working to transcend direct forms of violence, inequality, social and community conflicts, gender discrimination, human rights violations, and social, economic and political repression. The course aims to teach how to build capacity and to work together with and train participants in concrete skills, tools and methods for social action and transformation, building social movements and empowering organizations and communities.
The online course will examine strategies and lessons that can be learned from successful community interventions and social movements and people’s struggles, grass-roots and global movements. Participants will analyses and learn wide-range of social, political, economic, cultural and other point of views to community project development.

Conflict analysis is the systematic study of the profile, causes, actors, and dynamics of conflict. It helps development, humanitarian and peacebuilding practitioners to gain a better understanding of the context in which they work and their role in that context. This course presents an introduction to the subject of conflict analysis, illustrating analytical tools used, with reference multitude case studies to understand the dynamics of conflict. This course examines theoretical and practical frameworks for understanding conflict, with particular attention to structures and dynamics inhibiting peace. The course provides participants with some of the analytical skills needed to understand how conflicts develop and escalate, to identify factors that can lead to or sustain violence, and to map root causes of conflict (e.g., human rights violations, needs deprivation, cultural and religious differences, inequality, resource misuse and environmental degradation) at interpersonal, intergroup, and international levels.

This course offers a deeper understanding of the change processes that lead to more effective projects and impacts within organizations. It is intended to increase the students’ capacities to formulate strategies and to design, implement and evaluate projects within a development and conflict prevention perspective. The students learn and critically discuss the theories of change as well as the processes of strategic planning, and project design and evaluation. They apply these notions to the study of concrete cases and to the preparation of their own strategic development and projects. The course delves deeper on such tools as: all the steps leading to the formulation of strategic plans; context, problem and stakeholders’ analysis; project cycle; logical framework; outcome mapping; adaptive management; project implementation; phasing out; project monitoring and impact assessment.

The 21st century is described as the age of globalization, a phenomenon which is increasingly affecting human beings in every aspect of their lives. While globalization has undoubtedly resulted in significant economic and social integration at the global level, the pace at which it is occurring has also brought with it several unintended consequences for the respect and promotion of human rights at other levels. The principal institutions facilitating this phenomenon such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, the World Trade Organization and business corporations, have often been accused of keeping human rights issues out of their respective domains. The critical challenge, therefore, facing the present world order lies in ensuring that the vehicles of globalization are oriented towards development and promotion of human rights, through appropriate laws and policies. This course will introduce students to the major themes and debates concerning these different linkages between globalization and human rights and explore the new streams of critique that have enabled a confluence as well as a questioning of the globalization-human rights interface. The course will begin with a critique of the traditional understanding of ‘development as economic growth’ using scholarship from both economists and human rights practitioners. With this foundation, the course will critically examine the contemporary issues in our globalized world and their nexus with human rights, by focusing on topics such as the MDGs, development aid, international trade, investment, international financial institutions, intellectual property rights and businesses.

This course will introduce students to the relations between the environment, development, and peace and conflict. We will discuss the concepts of Global Environmental Change, Sustainable Development, Green Economy, and Environmental Security. We will draw on the examples of Climate Change and Deforestation, as two of the main environmental challenges the world is facing. We will analyze the different approaches to development inside the sustainable development discourse, and link it to the emerging Green Economy discourse arising in addressing Global Environmental Change and Poverty reduction. These themes will be explained and critically analyzed.

A second theme of this course is Environmental Security. We will discuss and analyze this field emphasizing on its complexity and some underlying neo-Malthusian ideas that still prevail in much of this literature. Specifically, we will look at the linkages between natural resources and conflicts focusing not only on environmental scarcities, but also on the resource curse and resource abundance approaches to so-called “environmental conflicts”. Similarly, we will discuss the role of the environment and of natural resources for sustainable peace, and how natural resources can or could be used in initiating a peace process.

Finally, the students will examine the Rwanda genocide and the different approaches used to analyze and explain this conflict. This case study will serve to bring all the concepts of this course together and to draw general conclusions.



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FACULTY

Dr. Abdalla is the Senior Advisor on Policy Analysis and Research at the Institute for Peace and Security Studies (IPSS) of Addis Ababa University, and the Senior Advisor on Conflict Resolution at KARAMAH (Muslim Women Lawyers for Human Rights). In 2013-2014, he was Vice President of SALAM Institute for Peace and Justice in Washington, D.C. From 2004-2013 he was Professor, Dean and Vice Rector at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace (UPEACE) in Costa Rica. Prior to that, he was a Senior Fellow with the Peace Operations Policy Program, School of Public Policy, at George Mason University, Virginia. He was also a Professor of Conflict Analysis and Resolution at the Graduate School of Islamic and Social Sciences in Leesburg, Virginia. He practiced law as a prosecuting attorney from 1978 to 1987 in Egypt. He then emigrated to the U.S. where he obtained a Master's degree in Sociology and a Ph.D. in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from George Mason University. He has been teaching graduate classes in conflict analysis and resolution, and has conducted training, research and evaluation of conflict resolution and peacebuilding programs in several countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. He teaches regularly (face-to-face and online) at American University in Washington, D.C., University for Peace, University of Addis Ababa, and Open University of Catalonia. Dr. Abdalla pioneered the development of the first conflict resolution training manual for the Muslim communities in the United States titled (“…Say Peace”). He also founded Project LIGHT (Learning Islamic Guidance for Human Tolerance), a community peer-based anti-discrimination project funded by the National Conference for Community and Justice (NCCJ). In 2011, he established with Egyptian UPEACE graduates a program for community prevention of sectarian violence in Egypt (Ahl el Hetta).

Daniela Ingruber is a war researcher, specialised on war photography, film and the ethical aspects of media-production, and a journalist and editor. She also works for the Diagonale – the Austrian Film Festival, as a political consultant as well as a writer for film productions. Besides her position at UPEACE she is a faculty member of the UNESCO Chair for Peace at the University of Innsbruck/Austria.
Website: www.nomadin.at

Head, Dept. of Peace and Conflict Studies, Assistant Professor, and Academic Coordinator Gender and Peace Building Programme and Peace Education Programme

Dr. Gal Harmat holds a PhD in Gender Analysis of Peace Education and Dialogue encounters from Nitra University (Slovakia) and a M.A. in Gender and Peacebuilding from the UN-Mandated University for Peace in Costa Rica. She was a professor in conflict transformation, peace education and gender and Co-Director of the Social Justice and Peace Education Teachers Training Program, Kibbutzim Teachers College in Tel Aviv, Israel. She has also been teaching in the World Peace Academy (University of Basel), the European Peace University (Austria), and the Arts and Social Change College in Israel. As a Gender and Peacebuilding Specialist, she has extensive experience in training, conflict analysis, dialogue facilitation, capacity building, peace education, research, gender empowerment and gender mainstreaming since 1998 in various countries in Eastern Europe, Africa, and West and South East Asia. Her consultancies include intergovernmental organizations (e.g. OSCE, UN Women, UNDP, and the Council of Europe), various international and regional NGOs (e.g. Non Violent Peace Force, Friends of the Earth Middle East; Peres Centre for Peace) and corporate donors (e.g. United Bank of Switzerland; Optimus Foundation).

Gal Peleg Laniado, J Street, Deputy Regional Director. Gal has joined J Street with over a decade of nonprofit expertise from his extensive work in conflict resolution, leadership development, and community outreach and empowerment in both Israel and the United States. Most recently, Gal served simultaneously as the Central Shaliach of Hashomer Hatzair Youth Movement in North America, as well as the Israel Representative for the Givat Haviva Educational Foundation in the United States. Hashomer Hatzair is a progressive Zionist youth movement that specializes in youth-led experiential Jewish Education, and Givat Haviva is the authority on and birthplace of Shared Society in Israel. Previously in Israel, Gal held the position of International Development Manager for Mifalot, an Israeli nonprofit that aims to create social change through educational projects targeting young people through Soccer. Gal was also the Director of the Sports Department at the Peres Center for Peace in Israel, which promotes regional and national peacebuilding efforts. Gal holds an MA in Conflict Resolution and Mediation from the Tel Aviv University, and a BA with honors in Communications and International Relations from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is also a graduate of the Columbia Business School’s Senior Leaders Program for Nonprofit Professionals. Born on Kibbutz Sdot-Yam, Israel Gal now lives in New York City with his husband Moshe.
Jan Breitling is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environment and Development at University for Peace. He holds a BSc. in Tropical Forestry, from the Technological Institute of Costa Rica, and a MSc. in Environmental Sciences from WUR Wageningen University and Research Center, The Netherlands. His research interests include root causes of deforestation and Global Environmental Change, and Environmental Governance, specifically market based approaches addressing biodiversity conservation and Climate Change.

Juan Carlos Sainz-Borgo is the Dean for Academic Affairs and Associate Professor at UPEACE. He is also Associate Professor of International Law at the Universidad Central de Venezuela in Caracas since 1998. Professor of Humanitarian International Law at the Universidad Sergio Arboleda in Bogota since 2009; he was Fulbright Visiting Professor at the Washington College of Law at the American University in 2008-2009. He served as Jurist to the Regional Delegation of Venezuela and the Caribbean of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). Juan Carlos Sainz-Borgo has a Law Degree, Master in International Law and Doctorate (Cum Laude) from the Universidad Central de Venezuela in Caracas and a Master Degree from Oxford University, UK. He has published four books on international law and international relations and a numerous articles in different publications in the field.

Juergen Carls (Ph.D.) is associated with the Department of Environment and Development since 2002. He is giving classes on sustainable development, strategic planning, project management and fundraising for international cooperation projects. Before he was teaching sustainable development at the Humboldt University of Berlin.

He studied "International Rural Development" and completed his doctoral dissertation at the Technical University of Berlin. His long term experiences as manager and government advisor of international research and cooperation projects financed by the WB, IADB, EU, FAO, GTZ in Asia, Africa and Latin America has been documented in 70 publications.

Lilya Akay is German of Turkish origin and she is a Research and Training Associate and Co-author of the C.R. SIPPABIO and “…Say Peace” Manuals. Lilya has completed her Master’s degree in Peace and Conflict Studies at the Hacettepe University in Ankara, Turkey in 2016. She is committed to countering Islamophobia and violent extremism, as well as working for women’s rights. Her Master’s thesis assesses the public discourse in Germany, discussing the relationship between public discourse and discrimination against hijab-wearing women in Germany. Lilya has a Bachelor’s degree in International Business and Management from Inholland University, Amsterdam, 2014. Lilya is an alumna of the 2015 Law and Leadership Summer Program of Karamah, she assisted the August 2015 training of Ikram and Karamah: “Promoting Healthy Marriage and Preventing Divorce in our Communities”. She participated in October 2015 in the Training of Trainers for the “…Say Peace” manual.

Assistant Professor, Dept. of Peace and Conflict Studies and Academic Coordinator International Peace Studies Programme and International Peace Studies with specialization in Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Programme
Dr. Manish Thapa is Resident Professor of International Peace Studies at UPEACE. He is one of the founding members of Department of Conflict, Peace & Development Studies at Tribhuvan University Nepal (2007-2015). He is also currently Visiting Professor at the Institute of International Relations, University of Warsaw, Poland and Senior Research Fellow at Center for Europe – University of Warsaw- Poland. He received his Post Doctorate in International Relations from the University of Warsaw, his Doctoral Degree in International Studies from University of Tokyo, Japan and Masters Degree in Peace & Conflict Studies from European Peace University, Austria. He has served as Research Fellow in several universities and institutes in Europe and North America such as the University of Warsaw; Department of Peace & Conflict Research, Uppsala University; Brown University; McGill-Echenberg Human Rights Fellow & Jeanne Sauvé Scholar, McGill University; Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame. His publications include 6 books and numerous journal articles and book chapters including "Foreign Policy in the Global South: Anti-Westernism, Rhetoric and Identity” -(Co-editor), London: Routledge 2016 (Forthcoming - In Press); “International Relations in Asia: Great Powers and Institutions-(Co-Editor), London: Routledge 2017 (Forthcoming - In Press).

Political scientist and prize-winning author Mary King is Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies, University for Peace. She has served as an Academic Adviser to the Africa programme, among other roles. She is also Distinguished Scholar with The American University Center for Global Peace, in Washington, DC, and a fellow with the Rothermere American Institute, University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
King has been a practitioner of international relations for 30 years—requiring personal contact with heads of state and government ministers of more than 120 developing countries. While a presidential appointee in the Carter Administration, confirmed by the U.S. Senate, she had responsibility for the Peace Corps (60 countries), VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America), and other national volunteer service corps programs. Since 1984, she has served as a special adviser to former president Jimmy Carter. 
As a young student, she worked alongside the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (no relation) in the U.S. civil rights movement. She was one of what the New York Times called a “tiny handful” of white, female “heroic, unsung organizers of the Southern civil rights movement.” Her book on that epochal four-year experience, Freedom Song: A Personal Story of the 1960s Civil Rights Movement, won her a Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Book Award in 1988. 
In 2002 the second edition of her book, Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr: The Power of Nonviolent Action, chronicling nine contemporary nonviolent struggles and originally published by UNESCO in Paris in 1999, was brought out in New Delhi by Mehta Publishers and the Indian Council for Cultural Relations. 
Her latest book is A Quiet Revolution: The First Palestinian Intifada and Nonviolent Resistance (New York: Nation Books, 2007; London: Perseus Books, 2008).
Next to come is a reference book: The New York Times and Democratic Transitions in Eastern Europe, 1977-2005 (Washington, DC: C Q Press/Sage, 2009).
She is currently completing a book project, Conversion and the Mechanisms of Change in Nonviolent Action: The 1924–25 Vykom Satyagraha Case, a study of an historic nonviolent struggle against untouchability in Kerala, India, in 1924?25, with a grant award from the United States Institute of Peace.
King was co-author, with Casey Hayden, of “Sex and Caste,” a document published by the War Resisters League in 1966 that served as kindling for second-wave feminism. The Americanist historian Ruth Rosen in The World Split Open: How the Women=s Movement Changed America says this article makes her a central figure in starting the contemporary U.S. women=s movement.
Her doctorate in international politics is from the University of Wales at Aberystwyth. In 1989, her alma mater Ohio Wesleyan University bestowed on her its highest award for distinguished achievement.
In November 2003, she was given the Jamnalal Bajaj International Award, which recognizes the promotion of Gandhian values. In receiving this prize in Mumbai (Bombay), India, she joined the ranks of such previous winners as Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu of South Africa, Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat of the United Kingdom, and Professor Johan Galtung of Norway.

Dr. Kanade is the Head of the Department of International Law and Human Rights at UPEACE, and is the Director of the UPEACE Human Rights Centre. He holds a Ph.D. in Peace and Conflict Studies with a specialization in Human Rights (Multilateral Trading System and Human Rights: A Governance Space Theory on Linkages) and a Masters degree in International Law and the Settlement of Disputes from UPEACE. He also holds a LL.B. from Nagpur University, India. Prior to joining UPEACE in 2009, Mihir practiced for 6 years as a lawyer in the Supreme Court of India and the Bombay High Court, focusing on issues of fundamental human rights violations. His principal area of academic research is Globalization and Human Rights.
Dr. Miriam Estrada-Castillo (Ecuador) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of International Law and Human Rights. Prior to joining UPEACE, Dr. Estrada-Castillo worked as the senior legal and political officer in the United Nations Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED). Prior to that position, she has worked with the UN system in various capacities, including as the International Prosecutor General, UN Peacekeeping Mission for East-Timor (DPKO), Expert and Vice-Chairperson of the Monitoring Committee of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), Chief of Field of the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, and the Latin America Regional Adviser on Gender, Human Rights and Culture of Peace for UNESCO. She has also worked as the President of the Ecuadorian Supreme Court of Juvenile Justice and as the Minister of Social Affairs in Ecuador. In her academic life, she worked recently as the Director of Master Degree Courses on Gender and the Law and Children in Armed Conflict, Lund University, Sweden. She is a Visiting Professor of the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law (RWI) and has also taught courses as a Visiting Professor at the Australian National University. She is the author of the Ecuadorian Law on Violence against Women and of the first Legislation for Minors and Family in the country.
An ethnobiologist who researches food harvesting in Costa Rica. For the past decade her research program has focused on access to food in Costa Rican national parks. Specifically her emphasis has been on Indigenous rights to access and harvest cultural food. Olivia is a member of the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the International Society of Ethnobiology, the Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage Project, and the POLIS Project on Ecological Governance. Being active within these networks allows her to work at the interface of policy and practice regarding food harvesting and access.

Dr. Rolain Borel is an Emeritus Professor at the Department of Environment and Development at UPEACE.

Dr. Borel worked at UPEACE for 23 years, first as a volunteer, implementing research and training activities in environmental conflict management and as an international consultant for bilateral cooperation agencies and from 2001 to 2011 as a full time faculty and Head of the Department. Born and raised in Switzerland, Dr. Borel is married and father of three (and proud grand father of one); he has made Costa Rica his residence home for more than 30 years.

Instructor, Liason, Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Specialization and Editor, Peace and Conflict Monitor and Peace and Conflict Review Ross Ryan holds degrees in political science and literature from McMaster University, Canada and the M.A. degree in environmental security from the University for Peace, Costa Rica. He is chief editor of the Peace and Conflict Monitor and managing editor of the Peace and Conflict Review, as well as instructor in the department of peace studies and liaison officer of the media, peace and conflict studies specialization. He is currently working on a research project entitled “Information Technology, Civic Engagement, and the Cyber-Ethnography of Peace Movements”.

Distinguished Professor, Head, Dept. of Peace and Conflict Studies and Coordinator, International Peace Studies Programme
Dr. Toh Swee-Hin (S. H. Toh) is Distinguished Professor and a long-term consultant to the Office of the Rector at the University for Peace, where he teaches in peace education, gender and peace building, and international peace studies. He holds a MEd. and a Ph.D. from the University of Alberta, Canada. He served as Director of the Centre for International Education & Development (University of Alberta) and the Multi-Faith Centre (Griffith University). Born in Malaysia, Dr. Toh has been extensively involved in education, research and action for a culture of peace, non-violence, human rights, gender equality, local/global justice, intercultural understanding, sustainability and interfaith dialogue in global South and North contexts. His international networks or consultancies include UNESCO, the International Institute on Peace Education, World Council for Curriculum & Instruction, UNESCO-affiliated Asia-Pacific Centre of Education for International Understanding, Peace Education Commission- International Peace Research Association, the Parliament of the World’s Religions and Religions for Peace. In 2000, he was awarded the UNESCO Prize for Peace Education.

Professor and Coordinator, Peace Education Programme
Dr. Virginia Cawagas holds an Ed.D. (Peace & Development) (meritisimus), MS in Educational Management and BS in Education (Mathematics). Her publications and contribution to the development of peace education curriculum, training modules and instructional materials is widely recognized. She has taught and facilitated workshops in peace education, development education, social justice education, multicultural education, and gender mainstreaming in curriculum development and policy making. She has long been involved in major transnational networks in peace education such as the International Institute in Peace Education (IIPE), the Peace Education Commission of the International Peace Research Association (IPRA), and the World Council for Curriculum and Instruction (WCCI).

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