Academic Course Calendar

Courses and Teachers
From May 2018 To May 2018
FROM TO
Course listings are continously updated with new information
Courses Teacher Credits # Weeks Dates
Climate Adaptation and Climate Justice
Recommended
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
2-22 May 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #5
Protection of Refugees (1 credit)
Mandatory
Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
(Costa Rica)
1 credits
1 week
2-8 May 2018
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Council Room
Gender and people on the move: Trafficking, Refugees, Asylum Seekers and Migration
Mandatory
Adriana Salcedo
(United States)
3 credits
3 weeks
2-22 May 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #3
Terrorism and Conflict: Issues and Perspectives
Mandatory
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
3 credits
3 weeks
2-22 May 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Education in Emergencies: Armed Conflicts, Disasters and Health Crises
Mandatory
Kees Wiebering
(Netherlands)
3 credits
3 weeks
2-22 May 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 p.m. At Classroom #4
Social Responsibility
Mandatory
Nika Salvetti
(Italy)
3 credits
3 weeks
2-22 May 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #2
Human Rights and Information and Communication Technologies
Mandatory
Mariateresa Garrido Villareal
(Venezuela)
1 credits
1 week
9-15 May 2018
At Council Room
Taller de Negociación y Liderazgo - Trabajo de campo - (2 créditos)
Mandatory
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
2 credits
2 weeks
14-25 May 2018
8:45am - 11:45am At Classroom #1
Indigenous People´s Rights (1 credit)
Mandatory
Mihir Kanade
(India)
1 credits
1 weeks
16-22 May 2018
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Council Room
The United Nations System and UPMUNC (Part II)
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
1 credits
1 weeks
28-30 May 2018
8:45 a.m. - 4:15 p.m. At Council Room



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COURSE DESCRIPTION

Contemporary gendered trafficking in persons for sexual exploitation and force labour, has been radically increasing and has become of the mayor economic enterprises worldwide. This course will focus on the structural factors interacting with gender inequality, such as other discriminatory practices, poverty, globalization, demand for prostitutes and sex tourism focusing on children, and the related issues of internally displaced individuals, migration and refugees. Women and children are highly represented among these populations. Additionally, proximate factors such as corruption, impunity, increased technological advances, lack of political will contribute to the understanding of sources  of this growing exploitation of vulnerable individuals. The course will also include a focus on international and national efforts to prevent, protect and punish human trafficking and manners in which to assess the effectiveness of these measures, as well as to   consider future challenges.

The course will focus on terrorism and related forms of political violence from a comparative and global perspective.  It will look at definitions, the prevalence of terrorism, techniques, the choice of targets, the effects of the media, and sources of support.  The course will also look at different types of terrorist organizations including ones that are primarily seeking to attain ideological objectives, groups with an ethnic or nationalist agenda, organizations with religious motivations, and those groups with a mixture of motives that are difficult to disentangle.  A portion of the course will also look at governmental support of local terrorist groups that target citizens of their own state.  In addition, it will look at counterterrorism and counterinsurgency techniques, including the effects that such activities can have on civil liberties. Finally, the relative success or failure of terrorist groups in achieving their objectives will be evaluated as part of the process of determining what the future is likely to hold.

This course seeks to clarify the range of purposes that education can and should fulfil before, during and after wars and other emergency situations as part of a humanitarian response and the transformative process of building a culture of peace.

The course focuses on (1) on the different educational challenges in various emergency contexts, (2) on participatory teaching-learning methodologies applicable in such contexts, and (3) on carefully designing education projects in relation to its impact on target groups and society at large.

Central to the course are examples from various conflicts, natural disasters and health crises. The examples show possibilities for formal and non-formal educational strategies and pedagogical methods for helping different kinds of vulnerable groups, the preventive role of education in improving survival and health prospects during or prior to emergencies. The examples are also used to show the conceptual insights, practices and guidelines on which international and local humanitarian agencies and civil society organizations base their work.

The course will be relevant to peace educators and peacebuilders, who want to contribute to educational initiatives and programs designed to meet the needs and enhance the well-being of peoples affected by situations of armed conflicts and other emergencies, whether natural or human–made.

In the last decades of the XX century, within the context of globalization, the need to look at new economic paradigms more in line with sustainable development became evident and notorious.

The triple bottom line approach is becoming the common language in every organization and the social pressure on both corporations, as well as governmental actors, civil society organization in providing ecofriendly goods and services, complying with International standards and codes of conduct as well as respecting and advocating for human rights, is rising day by day. 

Therefore there is a urgent need to reflect on the current practices and trends in responding to the world most urgent demands and at the same time challenge the most renowned models and framework to attempt looking beyond corporate social responsibilities approach as analyzing the social responsibilities of all stakeholders and promote a common understanding and synergy of actions which lead to the building of a new society which is more respectful and responsible in responding to needs and priorities of all citizens. 

The course will lead the students towards a critical review of the current approaches to CSR and looking beyond it to analyze the society as a whole, as per each actor involved.  

This is because it is the author’s belief that all stakeholders are equally responsible of market failure, for un respectful behaviors towards the environment and the society, and there is a collective need to look for answers and align policies and strategies to achieve common goals for the benefit of all. 

The course will be an interactive course built on theories and practical experiences of students, guest speakers and the instructor.

Technological developments increase the speed of social changes; requiring the reinterpretation and adaption of international norms. Human rights are part of this dynamic. They are continuously affected by the uses of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), and this course discusses this reality and provides students with the necessary skills to analyze the situation in the light of international human rights law.

The course starts with the understanding of the ICT, its importance for the current social organization, and the rules governing its use. Then, it continues with the study of the economic, social and cultural rights. Students will identify the main obligations derived from International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR), analyze how states should promote the exercise of these rights, and discuss some of the most relevant topics in this field nowadays (i.e. shared economy, health). Then students will consider the exercise of civil and political rights through the case of Facebook and Cambridge Analytica. Each class is designed to provide students with the tools needed to identify states’ obligation, consider the simultaneous protection of competing rights, and understand how human rights can be fulfilled in the digital era. By the end of this course, students will have the basic skills needed to promote and guarantee the exercise of human rights through the use of ICT.

This course introduces participants to the increasingly significant field of indigenous peoples' rights and looks at the contemporary issues that have paradoxically led to recognition of those rights on the one hand, while simultaneously challenging their implementation on the other. The course will address the broad spectrum of issues involved in the field of indigenous peoples' rights, beginning with who qualifies to be "indigenous peoples", the scope of their right to self-determination, the international and regional legal frameworks for the protection of their rights and the challenges associated therewith, and the debates surrounding the concept of indigenous governance. The course will also look closely into human security and human development issues relating to indigenous peoples, the impact of State policies on their culture and language, the issue of genetic research in the context of indigenous peoples and the effect of intellectual property rights on the traditional knowledge of indigenous peoples. Strong emphasis will be placed throughout the course not only on theory and law, but also on case studies from around the world. Students will explore debates on mainstreaming versus autonomy, participatory governance, scope of 'free and prior consent', amongst others.

The UPEACE Model United Nations Conference (UPMUNC) is a graduate-level simulation of the real United Nations Organization, its most important specialized agencies, and other associated organizations. UPMUNC provides a common platform for UPEACE students and participants from several other universities to discuss international affairs and to gain a greater understanding of the procedures of the United Nations. Participants become familiar with key global issues by becoming part of the international decision making process to resolve them, and in so doing, are given an opportunity to apply their skills in negotiations, public speaking, and diplomacy.



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FACULTY

Adriana Salcedo is an anthropologist focusing on conflict analysis, identity, migration and peacebuilding. She holds a Doctorate in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from George Mason University, in Virginia, United States, for which she conducted extensive research on forced migration, human rights and conflict in the Colombian-Ecuadorian borderlands and inner cities in Ecuador. With more than twelve years of experience in the analyzing social conflicts, her professional practice covers the Amazon basin, the Galapagos Islands and the Andean region (Ecuador, Colombia and Bolivia), the United States and the Dominican Republic. She has researched for and worked with various public, private and civil society institutions, including international organizations, NGOs, etc., as well as grass-roots organizations, including indigenous communities, women and minority groups (e.g. LGBT organizations). In the academic field, she has taught courses at the Simón Bolívar Andean University, at the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO) in Quito, Ecuador and at George Mason University in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area on conflict analysis, participatory methodologies for building peace, and human rights and conflict. She has several publications in indexed books and journals in English and Spanish, exploring issues of human displacement, conflict, migrant s’ rights and their link to public policies. Additionally, she has conducted numerous training courses and seminars for the Northern Virginia Mediation Center (as a Certified Instructor/Mediator), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the Ministry of Education of the Dominican Republic (DR) and the Canadian Embassy in the DR. She is fluent in English and Spanish, and possesses a good command of Portuguese, French and Quichua. She has traveled extensively in the Latin America and the Caribbean region, as well as in North America, Asia and Europe.

Kees Wiebering has been a professional practitioner in peacebuilding projects since the mid-1990s. Over the years, he designed, implemented, monitored and evaluated peacebuilding projects, as well as taught and facilitated many workshops on cross cutting peace building related issues. He works as independent consultant, mediator, trainer and coach for professionals in peacebuilding. His work focuses on dialogue, conflict sensitivity, peace and conflict impact assessment, intercultural communication, project development and peace education.

He holds a Master of Science in Philosophy and Physics and holds degrees in organisation development and mediation. He was member of the core-trainer team for a 4-month course for peacebuilders at the Academy for Conflict Transformation in Cologne, Germany. He is an independent lecturer at the Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main. His research interests are the role of dialogue in peace processes, civil society development and NGO cooperation.

Head, Dept. of Peace and Conflict Studies, Resident Professor and Academic Coordinator of International Peace Studies Programme and International Peace Studies with specialization in Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Programme
Dr. Manish Thapa is Head of the Department of Peace and Conflict Studies and Resident Professor of International Peace Studies Master Programme at the University for Peace. He is one of the founding members of Department of Conflict, Peace & Development Studies at Tribhuvan University Nepal (2007-2015). He is also currently Visiting Professor at the Institute of International Relations, University of Warsaw, Poland and Senior Research Fellow at Center for Europe – University of Warsaw- Poland. He received his Post Doctorate in International Relations from the University of Warsaw. He has served as Research Fellow in several universities and institutes in Europe and North America such as the University of Warsaw; Department of Peace & Conflict Research, Uppsala University; Brown University; McGill-Echenberg Human Rights Fellow & Jeanne Sauvé Scholar, McGill University; Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame. His publications include 6 books and numerous journal articles and book chapters including "Foreign Policy in the Global South: Anti-Westernism, Rhetoric and Identity" (Co-editor), London: Routledge 2017 (Forthcoming - In Press); "From Bullet to Ballot – Peacemaking and Peacebuilding in Nepal: Lessons Learned and Unlearned" (Editor), London: Routledge 2017 (Proposal accepted); “Internal Conflicts & Peacebuilding Challenges" (Editor), New Delhi: K W Publishers 2016 and "India in the Contemporary World: Polity, Economy and International Relations" (Co-editor), London: Routledge 2014.

Mariateresa Garrido is Teaching Assistant and a Doctoral Student at UPEACE. She holds two Master's Degrees one from UPEACE in International Law and the Settlement of the Disputes and one from the Central University of Venezuela in International Law. Prior to her Master's Degree she had been working in promoting and defending human rights in Venezuela with different organizations such as Transparency International and Espacio Publico. Her principal research area is related to freedom of expression and safety of journalists.

Dr. Mihir Kanade (India) is the Academic Coordinator of UPEACE, the Head of its Department of International Law, and the Director of the UPEACE Human Rights Centre. He holds an LL.B. from Nagpur University (India) and a Master degree and Doctorate from UPEACE. He is also an adjunct faculty at Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio (Spain), Cheikh Anta Diop University (Senegal), and Long Island University (United States). His principal area of academic research and study is International Law, Human Rights and Globalization, covering several themes within that interface including trade and investment, sustainable development, forced migration, indigenous peoples’ rights, public health, amongst others. He has extensive experience in training staff of inter-governmental, governmental and non-governmental organizations, as well as professionals, in the field of human rights. He acts as an advisor to several human rights organizations and corporations on issues related to international law and human rights. He serves on the International Advisory Board of the International Bar Association on the topic of Business and Human Rights. He also leads a project of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on promoting the Right to Development. Prior to his pursuit in academia, Mihir practiced for several years as a lawyer at the Bombay High Court and at the Supreme Court of India.

Director of the UPEACE Centre for Executive and Professional Education and a faculty member at UPEACE. Prior to this position, he served as Education Programme Manager of the Earth Charter Initiative, an international nonprofit organization. Before his 4-years in the non-profit sector, he worked both in the private sector and also as a high school teacher in Ecuador. He has a Bachelor's degree from Stanford University and his Master's from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Former Coordinator of the RMSED Programme at the University for Peace, Costa Rica from 2009 to July 2011. She Owns a Msc in Post-war reconstruction, graduated with distinction in 1999, University of York (UK). Bsc in Economics, graduated Cum Laude, 1992, University La Sapienza of Rome (Italy). Technical Diploma in accounting and foreign Languages, graduated in 1986, (Italy).

She has been working since 18 years in developing countries and war-torn societies in Africa (Uganda and Egypt), Asia (Indonesia), Middle East (Jordan, WBG, Lebanon, Yemen), Central America (Guatemala, Costa Rica) and the Balkans (BiH, Kosovo, Serbia, Macedonia) heading and managing emergency, rehabilitation and development projects for the European Commission (several years), SNV-Dutch Cooperation (1999-2001), CARE Nederland (2001-2008), MOVIMONDO (Consortium of Italian NGOs- 1995-1998).  She was also research fellow of the Institute of Nutrition for Central America and Panama (INCAP); University of York (UK) for research projects in Indonesia/Aceh and Lebanon/Beiruth; and of the University of Rome.  
An ethnobiologist who researches food harvesting in Costa Rica. For the past decade her research program has focused on access to food in Costa Rican national parks. Specifically her emphasis has been on Indigenous rights to access and harvest cultural food. Olivia is a member of the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the International Society of Ethnobiology, the Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage Project, and the POLIS Project on Ecological Governance. Being active within these networks allows her to work at the interface of policy and practice regarding food harvesting and access.

Instructor, Liason, Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Specialization and Editor, Peace and Conflict Monitor and Peace and Conflict Review Ross Ryan holds degrees in political science and literature from McMaster University, Canada and the M.A. degree in environmental security from the University for Peace, Costa Rica. He is chief editor of the Peace and Conflict Monitor and managing editor of the Peace and Conflict Review, as well as instructor in the department of peace studies and liaison officer of the media, peace and conflict studies specialization. He is currently working on a research project entitled “Information Technology, Civic Engagement, and the Cyber-Ethnography of Peace Movements”.

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